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Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes

Last post Apr 25, 2004 6:03 AM by Poll_KY_of_the_Purple_Ilk . 10 replies.


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  • Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    I am interested in the Electric Pressure cooker recipes, as I just love mine!! Thanks to QVC~! I have used it Several times, but would like to know if anyone else has one & what they cook in it!
    Thanks....
    Sandi
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  • RE: Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    You should be able to use any pressure cooker recipes--check your instruction book, they should have a section on that--or email the manufacturer.
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  • RE: Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    Looking for recipes based on a certain brand or type of cookware is a common misconception. You wouldn't limit yourself to using only the recipes that came with a blender or a toaster oven, so find any pressure cooker recipe you like and give it a try.

    Here is a funny article that takes a tongue-in-cheek look at the very thing you're asking about:

    http://missvickie.com/library/mypc.htm

    If you are new to pressure cooking in general, browse through the "Workshop" section for basic instructions.
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    "Wit is educated insolence." Aristotle

  • RE: Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    Thanks to patty613 & lindapearl for your responses. The only trouble I have is that they give the stove top method, without the conversion to the electic one! I got no clue what 10 lbs of pressure means on the stove top! I need a conversion method for these great recipes!
    Thanks anyway,
    Sandi
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  • RE: Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    Find some recipies for the stovetop cookers that you already have for the electric cooker. Compare the timing and pressure settings. Shouldn't take long to work out a rule of thumb.
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  • RE: Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    Stovetop p-cookers are much more versitile than electric models and many offer a choice of pressure settings which allows you to cook a greater variety of recipes. The standard pressure setting is 15psi, and conveniently the vast majority of p-cooker recipes use this as the default setting, in fact most recipes don't even bother giving the psi because the 15psi is the norm.

    Some p-cooker recipes call for pressures, but most use the standard 15psi. There are also a few brands, mostly of European manufacture, that use various lower pressure settings than the standard which makes them more difficult to use because you must calculate the increased timing diferences and that somewhat alters the finished dish.

    So the first thing you need to do is look thru your owners manual and find either the psi or temperature setting that it uses. Here is a link that shows a psi/temp chart and info on using standard psi recipes in electric models:

    http://missvickie.com/workshop/table.html
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    "Wit is educated insolence." Aristotle

  • RE: Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    To PollKyofthePurplellk....
    Ihope i copyed that right...if not , oh well!
    Stove top methods of Pressure cooking is not recorded or transfered to the electric method... There is no ratio! But that is just What I am looking for! What just is the ratio from stove top to electric? Thanx to all for your responses...... Sandi
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  • RE: Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    I can't believe you people belive this way! I am losing my trust in this post!
    All I wanted was a conversion from stove top to the electric method... Is that so much to ask? If so, SORRY!
    SANDI
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  • RE: Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    Sandi,
    I too have the electric pressure cooker that you were speaking of. What really helped me was a wonderful cookbook called Express Cooking by Barry Bluestein and Kevin Morrissey. I believe I ordered it from Amazon.com. This books features recipes for using the newer type electric pressure cookers as well as guidelines for converting your favorite recipes. There are also charts for cooking various foods. I love my pressure cooker and this book only added to my enjoyment. I hope you can purchase this book, as I believe it will answer any questions you might have. If I can help, please let me know.
    Jerrie
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  • RE: Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    I think everyone is TRYING to help, maybe we don't fully understand the difficulty you're having. Are you're asking how to actually operate your brand of cooker? Or do you need help with a particular recipe?

    As far as recipes go, ALL pressure cookers operate under the same principle. Regardless of what kind you have, you need to know 3 things:
    1). the temp or psi settings for your cooker (which varies widely)
    2). the psi called for in the recipe (which can also vary)
    3). the cooking time for the recipe (which is dependent on the psi/temp of the cooker)

    If the psi in a recipe is different from the psi/temp setting of your p-cooker then you need to adjust the cooking time - that's the only time you would need to "convert" or cooking times.

    In the example you cited before, using 10psi, if your cooker uses a standard setting of 15psi(254F), then the cooking time needs to be lowered by 1/3.

    If you are having trouble with a particular recipe why not post it and explain your dilemma so others can get a better idea of what you want?
    False

     

    "Wit is educated insolence." Aristotle

  • RE: Electric Pressure Cooker Recipes
    GOOD GRIEF Don't get your knickers in a knot. I said rule od thumb. Look at a recipe that you do have for your electric pressure cooker, say for beef stew. Then look at a recipe for beef stew done in a stove top cooker. Note the times and setting for both. Then look at the timing and settings for some of the vegetables and compare them. If you have two pressure settings they are probably 7 and 15 psi Most meats are done at 15 psi most vegtables at 7. Combination dishes are usually done in 2 steps. Meat and seasonings under high, then add vegetables and finsh under low.
    If something turns out overdone, remember to cut back on the time the next time. If the meat is still tough, bring it back up to pressure and cook for a few more minutes.
    Cooking is only part science and there sre very few exacts.
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