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Soft Homemade Bread

Last post Jan 22, 2008 6:30 PM by WATTLE . 5 replies.


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  • Soft Homemade Bread

    What can I do to make my breads soft & keep longer? How much gluton flour should I use?

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    Get It..Got It..GOOD!!
  • Re: Soft Homemade Bread

    Are you using a bread machine?  I have one, but I only use the dough cycle, and bake it in the oven. I like a light crust and my machine bakes it way too dark.  Besides, there's just something about a suare laof of bread that's not natural.  I always use all high gluten flour.  I worked at a bakery for 6 yrs. and that's all we used for the potato white bread.  If you kneading the bread by hand, the more you knead it, the better it is.  If you don't knead it enough, the bread will be dry and crumbly. 

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  • Re: Soft Homemade Bread

    Question to "blugrassgospel"    ---    When you speak of high gluten flour do you mean bread flour or is there another kind of flour besides that?  Interested because a local eatery/bakery makes the GREATEST breads and rolls and I would love to know their secret or method.  Could it have something to do with their ovens?  Interested because you said you worked in a bakery and you might have some insight.  Thank you

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  • Re: Soft Homemade Bread

    Hi Lori!  I found this online.  It explains it better than I can.  I would guess that the bakery you are talking about, probably uses a high gluten flour, as it would produce the best product.  I also add  vital wheat gluten [4 tsp. per loaf] whenever I bake bread or pizza dough, etc. 

     Can you please tell me the difference between bread flour and high-gluten flour? Can high-gluten be used in place of bread flour successfully?

     

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     Bread flour is a high-gluten flour that has very small amounts of malted barley flour and vitamin C or potassium bromate added. The barley flour helps the yeast work, and the other additive increases the elasticity of the gluten and its ability to retain gas as the dough rises and bakes.

    Flour sold as high-gluten or simply gluten flour has been treated to remove most of its starch, which leaves it with proportionately more of the proteins that produce gluten. It is generally used as an additive to doughs made of low-gluten flours, such as rye flour, to give them the elasticity that they can’t muster on their own.

    Some people use high-gluten flour to make a low-calorie loaf of bread, but, because high-gluten flour is about eight times as expensive as bread flour, most people don’t make the substitution.

     * I buy my high gluten at a natural foods store.  It's no more expensive than all purpose flour.  I pay 34 cents a pound, so I can get a 5 pound bag for $1.70. 

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  • Re: Soft Homemade Bread

    THANK YOU so much.  Very interesting.  Think I'll see if I can find some to try.  I do add extra gluten when baking and sometimes 'dough enhancer' I can find in Amish communities.

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  • Re: Soft Homemade Bread

    Thanking you all for this info;Paradise

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    Wattle Paradise