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fresh salsa

Last post Sep 09, 2012 6:48 AM by enjoynature . 3 replies.


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  • fresh salsa

    Can you freeze fresh salsa (made from home grown tomatoes) without it getting waterlogged?

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  • Re: fresh salsa

    I think it would be watery....but just drain it in a paper towel or cheese cloth lined colander prior to eating..

    husband cans salsas.....tomato and tomatillo....he loves salsa...

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  • Re: fresh salsa

    Hi Didee,

    I make lots of fresh salsa and freeze it.  Especially now when you can get loads of tomatoes and peppers at the Farmer's Market that have a spot here and there.  I but them cheaper and cut the spots out!  If you have ever seen what they call "fresh market salsa" at the grocery store, you'll notice it has a kind of watery consistency, that is what I think you are talking about the salsa looking like.

    I tend to cook my salsa down a little bit.  I throw all of the veggies (chopped up of course) and my spices in a pan and let them simmer on low for at least an hour.  The fuller the pan, the longer it should simmer.  Then I let it cool before putting it in freezer containers (I use jars).  I have noticed that this seems to get rid of a certain amount of any water when I open another jar to use.

    One more thing, I try not to use a super sweet onion in my salsa because they have more moisture in them.  I use more of what I call a storage onion.  A Spanish onion would be an example.

     

    kathy 

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    Taste of Home Field Editor since 2005

  • Re: fresh salsa

    I have made homemade garden fresh salsa for years by either canning it or freezing it. I have found that if you leave your tomatoes more chunky while making the salsa, then the salsa won't seem so liquidity. I am a dumper cooker, so I haven't used a recipe for years. I have a recipe somewhere around here. Any more I just add different ingredients that I want in my salsa, and cook it for a little while in my one big kettle, stirring it occasionally so all the flavors get cooked through. Then I let it cool, bag it up in bags for the freezer or can it in a water bath for a time period. I will use the salsa as salsa or add it when I am making chili or tacos. It adds a nice flavor to the chili and tacos.

    You have to keep in mind a tomato will break down into liquid tomato sauce or juice. So the liquid you see may be actually tomato juice. Also green peppers and onions can form a liquid of juice themselves depending on the how much moisture was in the growing season. So again it's natural to see some break down of moisture.

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