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green beans! and the pressure cooker

Last post Jul 02, 2008 11:55 PM by lindapearl . 8 replies.


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  • green beans! and the pressure cooker

    When I am ready to process the beans in the pressure cooker, are the jars supposed to be completely covered with water?  My pressure cooker is so huge, I will need a water hose to fill it up.Surprise

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    Luckiest girl in Aberdeen
  • Re: green beans! and the pressure cooker

    You only need a couple inches of water.

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  • Re: green beans! and the pressure cooker

    I was taught to put at least an inch of water above the top of the jars.  Not sure if it is correct.  Just know that was what I was taught.

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    License
  • Re: green beans! and the pressure cooker

    does it work for you though?   I just have this fear of making us sick

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    Luckiest girl in Aberdeen
  • Re: green beans! and the pressure cooker

    With the pressure cooker only an inch or two of water is needed.  I recommend checking the instruction booklet that came wiith the pressure cooker.  When sealing jars with the cold pack method the water is over the top of the jars and the processing time is much longer.  I haven't done that in so long I'm not sure I remember exactly how to do it.

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  • Re: green beans! and the pressure cooker

    Most pressure cookers come wirh a booklet to let you know how much water to put in. Mine

    is a 7 Qt. and I khave to put 2 quarts of water to process in it.  It is very important to read the instructions.  If you can't find the booklet, call the manufacturer and they can tell you how much to use in yours.

    Hope this helps.

    Mrs. J

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  • Re: green beans! and the pressure cooker

    Jars have to covered with at least a inch or so of water in a pressure cooker.  Years ago, before I had a pressure cooker,  I used a cold packer to process my green beans and it takes about 2-3 hours to process.  Pressure cooking green beans is the best way to can them.  It's so much quicker.

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  • Re: green beans! and the pressure cooker

    bella's mom
    When I am ready to process the beans in the pressure cooker, are the jars supposed to be completely covered with water? 

     

     

    No, covering canning jars with water applies only to high acid foods that are processed in a boiling water bath canner.  The correct recommendation from the current USDA publications, recommendations:

     

    "Put 2 to 3 inches of hot water in the canner. Place filled jars on the rack, using a jar lifter."


     

    For up-to-date canning instructions for green beans see:

    http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_04/beans_snap_italian.html

     


     

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    "Wit is educated insolence." Aristotle

  • Re: green beans! and the pressure cooker

    Goodness… looking at the wide variations in the replies to this straight foreword question, lets be careful when canning.  Remember, canning is a science, it's a very methodical, step-by-step process that follows a specific lab tested proceedure without alteration. In other words, done correctly, there should be no variation -- other than altitude differences -- in the way anyone is processing green beans.

     

    Low-acid foods like green beans must be processed in a pressure canner to be free of botulism risks. Notice that I said a pressure canner, and not a pressure cooker, because these are two separate pieces of equipment and they cannot be used interchangeably.  Yes, I know some pressure cooker manufacturers claim theirs is a dual purpose product, but don't let a clever sales pitch override your common sense or proven food safety guidelines.

     

    The USDA identifies a pressure canner as having a removable wire canning rack to lift and separate jars; it must have an automatic vent, a cover lock, a vent or steam port, and a safety fuse. The minimum capacity of a pressure canner to ensure food safety according to USDA processes, is four (4) quart-size jars... which immediately disqualifies pressure cookers for home canning purposes.

     

    Read more at: Using Pressure Canners.

     

     


     

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    "Wit is educated insolence." Aristotle