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Corn Meal Mush

Last post Feb 23, 2009 9:30 PM by bkbk . 63 replies.


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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    I love mush! We always made it the night before and put it in a loaf pan till the next morning. Then we would slice and fry it in butter and serve with syrup.  I'm gonna have to make that one day.

     

    I don't see any reason why you could'nt freeze it, but I would probably fry it first and then freeze it.

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    WoW!  I did not know I was in such good company.

     

    lindapearl..thank you for all the sugestion.  That is the recipe I use.  I buy my cornmeal from an Amish Bulk Store here and it is the ground stone type.  I do not use a pressure cooker as they scare me..lol..Once it starts to bubble I tip a lid on it (not tight) and lower the heat. Stir occastionally.  Usually done in 20 min. I am copying all your variations for futue use

     

     Now if any of you have not tried it or its been a long time. Get to it..lol..It is ssoooo good.

     

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    SmileRace ya to the kitchen....

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

     I like corn meal mush/polenta. I stir grated Parmesan into it. It really brings out that flavor.  I eat it with great northern beans.

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Big SmileBumping up for the corn meal mush lovers.

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    How about scrapple?

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Melanie...I beat you to the kitchen..LOL .I had some mush in a bowl with milk and Splenda to sweeten..The rest is cooling to be sliced and frozen...

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Mammaw, Scrapple was never meant to be made with cornmeal but with Buckwheat. The original German name is Panhas. The first German settlers who knew how to make it did not bring buckwheat seeds so used the next best things available that was plentiful: cornmeal. What they pass off as scrapple here I would not touch with a ten foot pole. It only tastes right made with buckwheat. I still make it and can it in wide mouth pint jars. The only difference is I don't use scraps but buy pork shoulder roast when on sale and use half meat and half buckwheat mush to make mine. I also like cornmel mucsh fried, but never with a few meat scarps floating around in it,  itjust would not taste right. If you type Scrapple into the search, I think  Iposted something close to the recipe in my grandmother's 1870s cookbook  a couple of times long ago.

    The secret to make good Panhas are thebuckwheat, an excellent meat broth and the right spices.

    We also made something like mush from farina (cream of wheat), when thick, we sliced and fried it and  served it as a main dish with a fruit compte and a vanilla sauce over the fried cream of wheat mush. The mush had eggs and milk in it but  no  sugar because the sauce and the fruit were sweet. We didn't have cornmeal.

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    So where do you get ground buckwheat ? At the health food stores ? I have never seen it . I have buckwheat flour at home but I am sure that is just for sourdough cakes , right?  This sounds like something I want to try to make . Would you post the recipe again please ?

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Never heard of corn meal mush being a Southern dish.  My ancestors ate "hoe cakes" which was fried "patties" of corn meal, egg, etc. and put syrup on them.  I don't think Scrapple is a Southern dish either, but more PA Dutch, isn't it?

     

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    lindapearl

    Here's my pressure cooker version... this is a recipe clip from my cookbook showing some interesting variations you might like to try. I always have plenty of leftover mush, so I lay the cut slices out on a tray that fits in my freezer to keep them separate. Then I stack them up in a bread wrapper. They will keep in the freezer for several months and a couple of frozen slices are easily reheated in the toaster oven, or thawed and pan fried in a little butter.

     

     

    Master Cornmeal Mush

    This thick porridge made from cornmeal is known as Polenta to Italians and gourmet cooks; in Colonial times it was Hasty Pudding; and it’s just Cornmeal Mush to Southern cooks, who also prepare a meatier version called Scrapple. This is a very easy dish to prepare, and it's so versatile that it can be sweet or savory depending on the ingredients. It's eaten as a hot cereal, as a side dish for dinner, or chilled and fried as a crispy bread. Using a pressure cooker makes quick work of this popular dish--no matter what name you prefer.

     

    1 cup yellow cornmeal
    [1/2] teaspoon salt
    1 cup cold water
    3 cups boiling water
    1 tablespoon butter


    Mix the cornmeal, salt, and cold water in a small bowl and set aside. This will keep the meal from getting lumpy when cooked. Bring 3 cups of water to a boil over medium heat in the pressure cooker. Stir the moistened cornmeal into the boiling water and add the butter. Stir constantly over medium-high heat until the mixture begins to bubble. Lock the lid in place. Bring to 15psi over high heat, immediately reduce the heat to the lowest possible setting to stabilize and maintain that pressure, and cook for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and use the cold water release method (see page 000) to depressurize. Carefully open the lid after the pressure drops. Spoon into serving bowls, add your choice of sweetener, and pour in a little milk or cream to taste. Serves 6.


    Variations:


    Breakfast Cornmeal Mush--Before cooking the cornmeal, stir in [1/2] cup chopped fresh or dried fruit, [1/2] cup toasted nuts, and a dash of cinnamon.


    Fried Cornmeal Mush--Pour the hot cornmeal mush into a buttered 8 x 4-inch loaf pan, cover with plastic wrap, and chill overnight or until firm. Turn the loaf out of the pan and cut into 1 inch thick slices. Heat 3 tablespoons butter, bacon drippings, or cooking oil in a small skillet over medium heat, add the slices of cornmeal mush without crowding, and cook each slice until crisp and lightly browned, about 2 minutes on each side. Serve with plenty of butter and a selection of jam, honey, syrup, and molasses, as you would pancakes.


    Cheesy Cornmeal Mush--Add 1[1/2] cups grated sharp cheddar cheese, [1/2] teaspoon ground sage, and [1/2] teaspoon Louisiana hot sauce to the cornmeal mixture after the cooker is depressurized. Stir to mix and cover with a regular lid until the cheese is melted. Serve as a side dish with butter and a sprinkle of chopped green onions.


    Blueberry Cornmeal Mush--Add 2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries. If using drozen berries, defrost them between layers of paper towels to absorb excess liquid. Gently stir the blueberries into the cornmeal after the cooker is depressurized. Serve with milk or cream and sugar.


    Scrapple--After the boiling water is added to the cornmeal, stir in 1 pound cooked pork, diced or shredded (use leftover pork roast, ham or sausage), [1/2] cup minced onion, 1 teaspoon ground sage, [1/2] teaspoon dried thyme, [1/2] teaspoon pepper, and [1/2] teaspoon Louisiana hot sauce.. After the cooker is depressurized, pour the hot cornmeal mush into a buttered loaf pan, cover with plastic wrap, and chill overnight or until firm. Cut into 1 inch thick slices and follow the directions for Fried Cornmeal Mush above.

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    above are the recipes lindapearl posted

     I use the same recipe on top of the stove....

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Teapot,

    TP, No, you don't use buckwheat flour, it is too fine. Yes you can get hulled buckwheat groats in a heathfood store. If you don't have a grinder, use your food processor and process only so ong until it looks like  very coarse cornmealor  finer cracked wheat.

    Oh, my, I don't have the recipe saved. Had my PC upgraded and the $%^%^##^&*&^ did not do a back-up of anything I had stored, incl m all my e-mails. Can't you look in the BB search box and type in Scrapple?

    In grandmother;s cookbook they did not give exact meaasurements. I cook the pork ( 1 qrt of water for each 2 lbs of pork shoulder) with celery, onions, carrots,bay leaf and whole pepper corns until it is done. I replace any water that has been lost during cooking. Take out meat and cool. Strain the broth but keep onions aside. After the meat has cooled, de-bone  and  trim off excess fat (I use about 80% lean), cut up and put through meat grinder with the onions, using the  fine grind. Cool broth until you can skim all the fat off. Re heat, season with salt, pepper to taste, some ground mace and cloves (careful with the cloves, it doesn't take much. because they are so strong)

    ) Taste until you like it. Bring to a boil.Thicken with the ground buckwheat (usinng same proportion as you would with water and cornmeal to make mush). Use a diffuser so it will not burn during the short cooking time.When cool enough thoroughly mix in the meat.Then I can some and keep some out to freeze. Wha tI want to freeze I put into a deep, square dish/pan  and cool until very stiff. I then  cut it into slices that I freeze with saran between them. Fried it gets a very delicate, tender and crunchy crust and is excellent served with apple sauce and a fried egg. Make sure you  have the same amount of mush and meat to mix together, that way you don;t need any meat as a side. It looks just like beef meatloaf, dark in color.

    When I make it I always have some people here who want some. In the old recipe they used less meat and used it more as a very economical dish. If times are hard it can always be done that way but with half meat and half grain it is still an economical dish and stretches meat 100 %. Not to mention it tastes good.

    Experiment with a small amount. You could use one lbs of unseasoned lean pork sausage, fry it, with some onion,then add a pint of water, season with a very small pinch of ceery salt,, a bit of salt and pepper and mace and a very small pinch of cloves, cook for a few minutes and then add enough buckwheat . Turn heat almost off and cook  until you have stiff mush.

      I think it tastes much better the way I described it but to make a msall batch to see if you would like it the sausage way may do it.

    When I make it I buy a whole big pork shoulder because of the canning I do, plus the freezing of some and what I give to friends,. It is so handy for me to have in wide mouth pints, it slips right out, makes nice round slices and is enough for 2 meals for me. and even 3 in a pinch.

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    I love mush but haven't made it in a long time~~I think I'm the only one in my family who likes it!

    I recently went to visit my dd and took her out to breakfast~~they have mush at that restaurant, it was really good!

     Btw, I'm in north central Indiana and I grew up having fried mush Wink never heard of scrapple til I met and married dh who is from pa dutch country

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    ICK........mom made this stuff when we were growing up cause it was cheap.....ICK......will not eat the stuff now.....

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