reheating turkey | Taste of Home Community  
Show Subscription Form




reheating turkey

Last post Nov 20, 2011 8:40 PM by enjoynature . 5 replies.


Forum Jump:
Page 1 of 1 (6 items)
  • reheating turkey

    can anyone please tell me the best way to reheat turkey,?? Iam cooking it the day ahead and dont want it to dry when i serve it the next day? any help would be appreciated....

    False
  • Re: reheating turkey

    A woman I used to work with always did this.  She cut up the turkey and put it in an electric roaster.  I guess she used most of the juice from the turkey for gravy, and added chicken broth to both the juice for gravy and for what she put on the turkey to reheat it.   But it does have to have juice or broth of some kind on it to keep it from drying out. 

    Very easy way to do the turkey!

    False
    1. Click for Rochester, Minnesota Forecast    

  • Re: reheating turkey

    thicken the juices and make a gravy and pour over the turkey.

    warm it up in the crockpot on low. (add water if it looks like it is drying out)

    False

    my blog! www.jillshomecooking.blogspot.com

    Been a big fan of TOH since I was a young teenager!!! I was sooooo excited to be asked to become a Volunteer Field Editor in June 2013!!

  • Re: reheating turkey

    For the past several years, I've made my turkey and stuffing the day before.  Then I carve the turkey and put it into one crock pot and the stuffing in the second crock pot.  The next day I put the crock pots on low and reheat.  Never had to worry about the turkey being dry and the stuffing comes out fluffy.

    False
  • Re: reheating turkey

    Do I need to bring the refrigerated turkey to room temperature before putting in crock pot?  Do I add anything to the crock pot for moisture?  How long does it take to reheat meat from a 19-20 lb turkey in the crock pot on low.   Thanks

    False
  • Re: reheating turkey

    I always bake my turkey the day ahead of Thanksgiving or any other family gathering. I bake it without anything in the cavity. I clean the bird, place it in the roaster that fits in the oven. I  add plenty of water to the bottom of the roaster that the turkey is swimming midway in water. I grease the bird with butter. I place the cover on the roaster and let it bake in the oven at 350 until it is good and tender. I baste it every once in a while. I then remove it from the oven when it's done. I then let it cool. Though a few quick sandwhiches are made by some family members.  I then pick the meat down to the carcas. Then cut up the meat and lay it a roasting pan or my large sheet cake pan or a container that will seal. I then strain the broth  the turkey was cooked in. I then pour enough broth over the sliced turkey that it its totally submerged. Then cover it with the roasting lid or lid of the container or aluminum foil. If I use aluminum foil I make certain it's completely sealed with no air holes or light on the turkey and broth.  Then I refrigerate it. There is usually more broth leftover that it gets placed in a container for stock or gravy.

     I have found if the turkey is not surmerged completely with broth in the pan. Or covered completely with a  sealed tight  lid or aluminum foil it will turn an awful looking brown and dry out.

    When I am ready to use the turkey the next day for the meal. I place the turkey and broth in a roaster or my large sheet cake pan and cover it. Then I place the pan or roaster in the oven at 350. Depending on how much meat I have from the turkey depends on how long I will heat it up. It can be 2 to 3 hours or more depending the amount. It usually take only a couple hours for the size of the bird I bake. The more the meat the more longer it will take to heat up. But I still think it's quicker then baking a bird from the start on the big day. 

     I  really prefer to use my one big slowcooker and let the slowcooker heat up the premade turkey. You can also do this with an electric roaster. I remove the turkey and broth from the pan it was refrigerated in and  place the cut up meat, and broth in the slowcooker the minute I am in the kitchen. Again the meat needs to be submerged. Then I let the slowcooker or electric roaster heat up the meat and broth on medium or high until the rest of the meal is ready.

    I have found the turkey is so juicy and moist and tender doing it this way. It litterly is falling to pieces and is so enjoyable. It also helps with time to not have a turkey in the oven and then to carve it.When other things are needed in the oven. Though I do incorporate the slowcookers and electric roaster for many of the other side dishes.  Plus I don't like dry turkey. Doing it ahead helps make it moist if you do it the way I said.

     I have also done this method weeks before a huge family gathering with a meal or family  reunion. I have baked my turkey and let it cool. Then placed the sliced turkey in broth in  a container with a sealable lid. Again it has to be totally surmerged in broth to taste good and not be dried out or an awful brown.  I freeze the container of turkey and broth. I  then remove the turkey container from the freezer the day before needing it and then place the frozen container in the refrigerator. I then  place the turkey and broth in my slowcooker the day of the gathering or reunion and let the slowcooker heat it up. So handy especially if a big crowd is here or if I need a meat dish for a reunion. Just as fresh as if I had just made it. But more enjoyable moist.

    False