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pressure canner question - green beans

Last post Aug 08, 2011 2:46 PM by hidecogal . 10 replies.


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  • pressure canner question - green beans

    Am sure someone out there has enough experience to help me.  My experience with pressure canner cooking was last year when I canned vegetable soup.  It turned out wonderfully.  I have done a lot of hot bath canning, but not pressure cooker.  I followed my Blue Ball book religiously.

    Yesterday I canned four quarts of green beans - they turned out wonderfully.  The second batch of four quarts of green beans came out with half of the liquid gone.  It did seem to be running hotter, I checked my book and it said maybe I didn't release enough of the air.  I did run a wooden skewer all along the sides and saw bubbles rising.  I did the same thing for the first batch as I did the second batch, but obviously I did something wrong.  I do not thing they are safe to store in my can cupboard in the basement so I put them in the fridge.  Two of them sealed and two of them didn't.

    Any advise would be accepted gratefully.  Would love to can more vegetables this summer due to the price going through the roof.  It is very disappointing to be finished and realize it didn't work.

    Thanks in advance.

    Janet

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  • Re: pressure canner question - green beans

    Someone surely knows the answer toJanet's question, so am bumping.

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  • Re: pressure canner question - green beans

    I have had the same problems at times when I pressure can. Here are some things that I learned.

    Tighten the lids enough on the jars. If they are too loose, liquid boils out. Just do it by hand, no tools and it will be fine.

    Don't let the canner go up and down in pressure after you reach your canning pressure. Sudden changes in pressure, will make the liquid boil away.

    Check to see that the lips of the jars are very clean before putting the flats on.

    Let the canner come to zero pressure on its own before removing the lid. I let it sit ten minutes before I take the weight off just to be sure. If the pressure changes suddenly, liquid will bubble out.

    If the directions indicate that you can pressure can at a lower pressure for longer then do that instead. I have better luck with my tomatoes if I do them at 10 lbs for a longer time.

    Jars that have lost liquid but still seal are OK to keep.

     

    I hope this helps a bit.

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  • Re: pressure canner question - green beans

    You can take the 4 quarts of beans that half sealed and didn't seal, and open them and dump them in a freezer container or bag. Then freeze them. They are not safe to sit on the canning shelf with what did seal after the sitting.They have left air trapped inside the jar with half filled with water. Those jars then have a chance to mold. Freezing the contents is a better bet then letting them sit on the shelf and take a chance of molding.

    Your problem could be several things.

    First was your jars not chipped with a little chip.

    Your biggest possible is pressure. You need to start fresh every time you start a new load to can anything in the canner. Start like you have never put anything in the canner before. Make certain you have enough water that is recommended in your book that goes with your canner. Each pressure canner has its own recommendation on how much is needed in water in the base of the canner. Make certain your jars have enough head space and are sealed with no cracks or chips, with a ring and seal. Make certain they have no air bubbles inside the contents of the jars. Wipe them clean. Then place them in the canner. Start slowly bringing the pressure canner up to pressure. Make certain you keep it at the same pressure needed for what you are canning. Time it right for the recommended length of what you are canning. Make certain the canner is brought down to pressure slowly. Then let sit for a while. Before you open it. IF  your canner is brought up to pressure to soon or left down with pressure out to soon. Then you have a better chance of no liquid in the jars. Also if you don't have enough water in the bottom of the canner. Or if your jars are not sealed. But it's more the answer is a pressure problem. The canner will dry the water from the can goods with not enough pressure or rushing the pressure.

    I have been canning for over 30 something years. I had one year where I had more water out of the jars of beans when I removed them from the pressure canner. An elderly friend told me what I told you above. But the key was pressure. I have learned over the years, that it's best to start fresh each time I can a load of beans or anything. Then to learn to take my time doing it. Which is hard when you have bushels of beans needing canned. A rushed pot is a spoiled pot. Even in canning you can't rush things.

    Try again and keep learning. Good luck! Enjoy your bounty of what you have to enjoy from the gardens. My garden is a bust this year. To much hot weather.

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  • Re: pressure canner question - green beans

    if the jars are sealed they are fine...they just have less liquid. won't hurt them at all. i've had that problem . in yrs past off & on as well. the beans are safe to use & store even tho they have less liquid just as long as they are sealed properly.

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  • Re: pressure canner question - green beans

    thanks for the information.  a friend of mine insists it is because it is the rocker type and not a gauge type.  I got this from a garage sale years ago - it works fine but I am still questioning the pressure?  Might look into a new pressure canner.  Thanks again.

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  • Re: pressure canner question - green beans

    Do you have an electric range or gas?

    I have canned on an electric range only ONCE and do not like it because you cannot keep the pressure even. IT got irritating  to stand there to keep switching the heat from simmer to low in order to keep the pressure even.

    With a gas range there is no problem. It takes about 5 minutes from the time you get the steam up to adjust the flame so the pressure stays the way it is supposed to be.

    I would never have a canner without a dial gauge pus the weight and I would never buy an old canner unless I took it to the County Extension Service to have it checked out. They can check the pressure gauge, the safety pop-off valve and the petcock the weight rets on.

    If a second hand canner is real old you may not be able to get those small parts or even the seals (gaskets) any longer.

    Mirro does not seem to be in business any longer. Presto canners have been made in China for quite some years. The only pressure canners still manufactured in the US ais the "All American". They are the Cadillacs of pressure canners, made of heavy cast aluminum and do not need a seal/gasket but are machined so the lid fits tight while screwed down. They are expensive but worth every penny because they last more than a life time.Mine is now 51 yrs old.

    I gave a 16 qrt Presto with dial gauge to my young friends and bought a smaller 12 qrt one in addition to the old All American and use them both. The Presto for things that don't require a long time and the old American for the the heavy duty longer time canning.


    Check Amazon for an All American or look on ebay for one that is used but in very good  condition. If you really can't afford one go for a 12 qrt Presto(with a dial gage) that will hold 7   quarts jars.

    I wash the seal on the Presto after every use and after 10-12 uses give it a very light coat of cooking oil to keep it liable but buy a new one every 3 - 4 yrs. Also have the pressure gauges checked once a year,, it's a free service by the extension service.

    Like the others said, don't worry about some of the water boiling out, it happened to me when I was canning on the electric range until I stood there and watched the gauge and kept adjusting the heat of the burner to keep the pressure even. The sealed canned goods were still good.

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  • Re: pressure canner question - green beans

    Janet as long as it sealed you are OK... I have had it happen before too.... just happens.... as far as the rocker style... I have both a rocker and a guage style perssure canner (yep suffer canner envy I have 2 !!!)  I prefer the guage but have never had a problem with the rocker.,... just keep it at a nice steady rock....

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    Old age ain't no place for sissies . -Bette Davis-
  • Re: pressure canner question - green beans

    Thanks again for all who replied.  My stove is gas - not electric so that isn't the problem.  Made a big batch of delicious vegetable beef soup (with lots of beans) yesterday and have it for my lunch today.  Will keep those four quarts in my fridge even though you guys say they are safe, just looks weird to me.  Spent some time last night looking at the All American pressure cookers on line.  

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  • Re: pressure canner question - green beans

    Sometimes overpacking the jars causes problems.  The one thing I really have to watch carefully are apricots.  If anything is going to lose liquid, it's those!  Doesn't look great but they are fine if sealed & used within the year.  I've also had a better success rate using wide mouth jars, instead of regular.  Like others mentioned, don't be in a rush to remove the jars from the canner after processing.  (I use a dial gauge on a gas stove at 3500-3600 ft. altitude.)

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  • Re: pressure canner question - green beans

    Here's your problem, it's simplier than you think. I had the same problem. You need to let turn off heat and take the canner off the burner, I just push it to the back burner and let the pressure canner come to zero on it's own. If you open the petcock and let the pressure out by force it will then sifen out the liquid out of the jars. I just called my county extension service in Iowa to verify this . If you have further problems you can call them at 1-800-854-1678 .

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