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3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

Last post Mar 10, 2014 5:14 AM by annrms . 16 replies.


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  • 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    Happy Monday!  Another week, another challenge.  You all did SO great last week!  I'm impressed.

    Tomorrow is Fat Tuesday so I want you to find the fattest cookbook in your collection, once you have it turn to the 3rd recipe of the 4th chapter.

    That is your recipe this week!

    As always you can go plus or minus 5 pages to find a recipe that suits your family's likes or dislikes.

    Post your recipe and review here!  Can't wait to see what you come up with.

    False

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  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

     Ha ha!! Oh boy!! This should be good!!

     

    False
  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    Is that fat by pages or fat by measured width?

    False

    I don't often get asked to define irony, but when I do, I always say,

    "Why, yes.  Yes, I AM a Field Editor for Taste of Home."


  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge
    Either is fine.
    False

    Community Manager

    Taste of Home Magazine

    Feel free to contact me if you have questions or concerns with the Taste of Home website or community.

    PM me here, find me on Facebook or email me sstetzel.toh@gmail.com

    Proudly serving as a Taste of Home Field Editor since 2009.Big Smile

  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    Well, sure, leave it up to me.  You know I can't make these agonizing decisions!  I'm a Pisces, for gourdsake! 


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    ...





    ...





    I suppose I could use this ambiguity to my advantage and call it "art."   Yes, I'll try that.  I'll approach this from a completely artistic standpoint.    

    False

    I don't often get asked to define irony, but when I do, I always say,

    "Why, yes.  Yes, I AM a Field Editor for Taste of Home."


  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    You can do it...I have faith. 

    If you really can't decide...pick two.

    False

    Community Manager

    Taste of Home Magazine

    Feel free to contact me if you have questions or concerns with the Taste of Home website or community.

    PM me here, find me on Facebook or email me sstetzel.toh@gmail.com

    Proudly serving as a Taste of Home Field Editor since 2009.Big Smile

  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    sstetzel
    If you really can't decide...pick two.




    Has anyone mentioned lately that you are EVIL?  I just noticed.

    False

    I don't often get asked to define irony, but when I do, I always say,

    "Why, yes.  Yes, I AM a Field Editor for Taste of Home."


  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    Fattest cookbook, measured width is The America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook.  Fourth chapter is about sandwiches.  Third recipe is for "Tuna Melts".  I'm in!  It's on the Sunday menu.

    False

    AnnStar

  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    cast_iron_king
    Has anyone mentioned lately that you are EVIL?  I just noticed.

    Krissy always said I was sweet...I hold onto that label.

    False

    Community Manager

    Taste of Home Magazine

    Feel free to contact me if you have questions or concerns with the Taste of Home website or community.

    PM me here, find me on Facebook or email me sstetzel.toh@gmail.com

    Proudly serving as a Taste of Home Field Editor since 2009.Big Smile

  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    Krissy said everyone was sweet, even me. So you know she lied sometimes.

    No, wait, she called me bodacious. I guess that's different. Wink

    False


  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    sstetzel
    Krissy always said I was sweet...I hold onto that label.

    Well, bless your heart!  I guess it must be true...

    False

    I don't often get asked to define irony, but when I do, I always say,

    "Why, yes.  Yes, I AM a Field Editor for Taste of Home."


  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    I have quite a few that are close in size so I picked Woman's Home Companion Cookbook. The fourth recipe would be coffee so I move onto the the tea section. An interesting note - this cookbook has the copyright date of 1942. What I found interesting are the coffee recipes which include Iced Coffee Frappe and Iced Mocha. There's nothing new under the sun! The fourth recipe is for tea is called Spiced Tea Granite. Can't wait to try it.

    False

    Patty

    :) Happy to be a Taste of Home Volunteer Field Editor

    ...Today is a gift, That's why it's called the Present
    Eleanor Roosevelt

    Cookbooks should be read like novels!
  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    I had my book, Amy Vanderbilts's Complete Cookbook, picked out--one of 3 fat ones.  I was going to make English Muffins, but it doesn't  look like it will fit in to do it.  It's been a busy week. I might still make them sometime later.  It sounds interesting.  I should be able to join in next week.

    False
  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    I'm back with my recipe. The biggest, fattest cookbook I have is the Taste of Home Cookbook. It is huge. The fourth chapter is Beef and Veal but since we can go five recipes either way, I backed up to the last recipe in the third chapter of Soups and Sandwiches, called Toasted Reubens.

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    This is not only a super quick recipe but I swear it tastes better than some deli Reubens I have eaten in the past. I followed the recipe to the letter except that I halved the recipe for two sandwiches. I hesitated when I saw sweet pickle relish as an ingredient as it is not one of my favorites but I wanted to prepare the recipe as written so I used it. I also used horseradish and it was not too hot. All the ingredients together gave the sauce a delicious flavor. Don't leave any out. I had a difficult time finding corned beef as Walmart informed me that they did not carry it any more since no one bought it. I ended up buying some deli pastrami in Kroger. No corned beef. That is really hard to believe. At any rate, the pastrami worked perfectly. The recipe calls for 8 oz. of sauerkraut but that is not to be found around here. I had to open a 14 oz. can so I do have some left over. I used seedless rye bread and in the end, the sandwich was absolutely delicious. I swear it was as good as a restaurant Reuben, if not better. DH, who years ago did not like rye bread or sauerkraut or even corned beef, declared it delicious and wants it again. We will be having this again, and soon, since I have many of the ingredients left over. This is definitely a five star winner.

    Here is the recipe and my picture.

    Toasted Reubens Recipe

    New Yorkers say my Reubens taste like those served in the famous delis there. For a little less kick, you can leave out the horseradish. —Patricia Kile, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania
    TOTAL TIME: Prep/Total Time: 20 min.
    MAKES: 4 servings

    Ingredients

    •   8 slices rye bread
    •   4 teaspoons prepared mustard
    •  4 slices Swiss cheese
    •   1 pound thinly sliced deli corned beef
    •   1 can (8 ounces) sauerkraut, rinsed and well drained
    •  1/2 cup mayonnaise
    •  3 tablespoons ketchup
    •   2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish
    •   1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
    •   2 tablespoons butter

    Nutritional Facts

    1 sandwich equals 705 calories, 45 g fat (15 g saturated fat), 124 mg cholesterol, 2,830 mg sodium, 41 g carbohydrate, 6 g fiber, 34 g protein.

    Directions

    1. Spread mustard over four slices of bread. Layer with cheese, corned beef and sauerkraut. In a small bowl, mix mayonnaise, ketchup, relish and horseradish; spread over remaining bread. Place over sauerkraut. Spread outsides of sandwiches with butter.
    2. In a large skillet, toast sandwiches over medium heat 3-4 minutes on each side or until golden brown and cheese is melted. Yield: 4 servings.
    Originally published as Toasted Reubens in Taste of Home October/November 2002, p8
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    I hope you enjoy this yummy sandwich as much as we did.
    Joan
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    Land of the Free....because of the Brave Click for Fort Worth, Texas Forecast

    Proud Field Editor for Taste of Home for 16-1/2 years.


  • Re: 3/3 ~ Cookbook~aholics Challenge

    No fair, MarineMom!  That looks too good!  I'm going to be craving a Reuben all day! 



    The thickest cookbook I have is The Culinary Arts Institute Encyclopedic Cookbook, copyright 1948.  This was the first cookbook Dogger and I owned together, and you can see it has been put through its paces.  We bought it used and then proceeded to press the point!  For a long time, it was the only cookbook we owned.  It doesn't have a lot of the frilly new-style dishes in today's cookbooks, but it is an indispensable guide to everything you need to know about true cooking from scratch.  I wasn't sure if it really was the thickest cookbook we have because years of use have cracked the spine so that it may appear thicker than it actually is, but it is certainly the biggest by page count (1040!), so I figured this was the right book.



    Part of the fun of this book is that is was obviously geared toward teaching new brides how to be good wives in 1948.  It tells how your kitchen should be properly laid out for maximum efficiency, and gives such helpful instructions as how to clean a refrigerator or a range ("The modern range is as easy to take care of as a set of mixing bowls.  The parts are easily disassembled making it a simple matter to keep each part scrupulously clean!")  One has to wonder what the heck they were using for mixing bowls...


    The directions led to the section "Breads, Biscuits and Rolls," and the recipe is Anadama Bread.   With a name that sounds like it came off an Alan Parsons album, I just had to do a little research to see what this bread is all about.  It turns out that Anadama bread is a traditional New England bread made with molasses, corn meal and wheat or rye flour.  It is also a rather sexist concoction.  You see, the story goes that Anadama Bread got its name from the fisherman who created it and referred to it as an insult at his wife, Anna.  Anna, it turns out, was not very imaginative in the kitchen.  So every night the fisherman got the same meal, over and over.  One night, after a hard fisher day, the fisherman came to find the cornmeal mush cooking on the mantle, and for the poor fisherman it was one day of cornmeal mush too many.  So he angrily threw some flour and molasses into the mixture and baked it, all the while muttering, "Anna...[expletive] her!"  Now, I guess that's a cute Lake Wobegon-style tale of how a food gets its name, but what it completely fails to take into account is that maybe this fisherman wouldn't have been eating corn meal mush every night if he even aspired to being a mediocre fisherman.  I think the real story is that Anna was probably a fine cook, but her fisherman husband was apparently a failure at his chosen profession, since he couldn't provide Anna with even the occasional...uh...FISH...to break the monotony. 

    I'm willing to bet that it was Anna who knew to add the yeast, but the story doesn't say anything about yeast, so we'll never know.  Meanwhile, Anna had to live with the shame of knowing her husband's popular bread recipe was a deliberate insult to her.  Since it was International Women's Day when I made this, I decided it was time to clear the air once and for all, to right this horrendous injustice.  I am petitioning the New England States to officially name this bread, "Fisherman's Failure." 



    1/2 cup yellow corn meal
    2 cups boiling water
    2 tablespoons shortening
    1/2 cup molasses
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 cake yeast
    1/2 cup lukewarm water
    5 cups sifted flour (about)

    Stir corn meal very slowly into the water just before it boils.  Boil 5 minutes.  Add shortening, molasses and salt.  Cool.  When lukewarm, add yeast softened in warm water and enough flour to make a stiff dough.  Knead well.  Let rise until slightly more than doubled in bulk.  Shape into loaves, place in greased loaf pans and let rise until light.  Bake in a hot (400°) oven 1 hour.  Makes two loaves.

    I halved the recipe because I only wanted one loaf.  Even so, this required a LOT of extra flour.  The dough was extremely wet.  I think I used about a cup extra flour for a half recipe, so you know that's a significant thing.  It did rise beautifully, though, after working in all that extra flour.


    Ready to avenge Anna!

    The bread baked up just fine and it smelled really good.  You could detect the molasses on the breeze.  It was quite sweet.  The crust was REALLY dark.  Dogger thinks it baked too long, but it's not burnt.  It just has a thick dark crust. 






    Well, we both find the bread flawed, but for different reasons.  Dogger didn't like the thick dark crust, but said the soft, inner bread was just fine.  Myself, I found all the flavor to be in the thick crust, with the soft inner bread kind of bland. 

    We both agree this would be a fine bread for soup, though.  There's nothing really wrong with this bread, it just didn't hit any high notes with us. 


    Armed and ready for next week...!



    False

    I don't often get asked to define irony, but when I do, I always say,

    "Why, yes.  Yes, I AM a Field Editor for Taste of Home."