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At what age does a cat stop growing?

Last post Sep 30, 2005 11:19 AM by Swaniecat . 4 replies.


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  • At what age does a cat stop growing?
    Just wondering...Callie is about one year old now and she weighs more and is larger than either of the two torties we had before her. Can I expect her to grow any more?
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  • RE: At what age does a cat stop growing?
    I think mine kept growing up to about 18 months.
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  • RE: At what age does a cat stop growing?
    Found this on a website, but keep in mind that different breeds of cats vary in size when full-grown. A cat could be full-grown at 6 lb or 12 lb, depending on many factors. But according to this, 12 months old is full-grown.

    How do you compare a cat's age to a person's age? --Eva

    Good question, Eva! I consulted with Dr. Arnold Plotnick, Vice President, ASPCA Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital, and he told me that a six-month-old kitten is like a person who's just entering the teen scene. By the end of his first year, a cat is equivalent to a 21-year-old person--because that's when both species reach full size and when their bones stop growing. After that, every cat year equals four people years. "A 20-year-old cat would be like a 101-year-old person," says Plotnick. So how old are YOU in cat years?
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  • RE: At what age does a cat stop growing?
    I've always found that it takes up to 2 years for a cat to reach it's full growth. Seems to depend a bit on when you desex them too, especially the males. I've got 3 at the minute and all took about 2 years, I usually desexed them around the 7th or 8th month when they are male and the females after they've gone into heat.
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  • RE: At what age does a cat stop growing?
    The old timetable for dog years (multiply each chronological year by 7)is not accurate. Dogs and cats reach sexual maturity quicker than humans, so their early years/months are at a greatly accelerated rate of maturity. Once they reach full growth/maturity, this rate levels off--making a two-year old cat(or dog)on a par with a 21 year old human; then aging about 3-4 years for the passage of a chronological year thereafter.

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