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Corn Meal Mush

Last post Feb 23, 2009 9:30 PM by bkbk . 63 replies.


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  • Corn Meal Mush

    I have seen where many talk about oatmeal and it is good for you

     

    But how long has it been since you fixed corn meal mush? How do you fix your's

     

    I cook the old fashion kind you cook for 20 min.  Then sometimes I will cool it and slice it then fry it.  So good that way with syrup. 

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Now that I have brought the subject up I have a question.  Can it be sliced then frozen? I live alone and can not eat a lot at a time..

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Its great to meet another corn mush lover! My grandma hated the stuff, but she would always make some up for me and my grandpa...the only two mush lovers in the family. We would buy it in blocks from the grocery store. She would slice it, fry it and we would eat it with lots of syrup. Mmmm.

    As long as you slice it and wrap each piece with plastic wrap and then put them into a freezer bag...they will be okay. When you want to cook them remove the slice or slices you want, let thaw in the fridge and cook like normal in the morning.

    Melanie

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    OH thank you  Melanie73...Maybe its an age thing. .lol..I remember my MIL who has passed many years ago..fixing it for my hubby..He sure did love it...

     

    Now that I think about it I saw some in the grocery store not long ago. It was in a block ready to be sliced. Or naybe it was sliced.

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Thats funny .... It reminds me of my Grandma . She always made us mush . Sometimes we fried it and sometimes we just ate it right when it was still soft with sugar and milk on it . What else I remember is that Grandma never pronounced it Mush , she said "Mursh ' .

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

     We grew up eating corn meal mush with sugar and milk, but I don't ever recall Mom frying it, and having it with syrup.  It sounds good.  We always liked mush, and I figure that's what we ate on school mornings.  That's been many, many years ago.  I don't think I have had it one time since I left home.

    I don't believe I've made it myself since I've been married, and that's been 38 years.

    Barbara 

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    corn meal mush...mmmmmmmm

    used to eat it, but can't get it up here

    there was a company that sold it in Pa

    never tried to make it myself

    fried with butter and syrup

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Here's my pressure cooker version... this is a recipe clip from my cookbook showing some interesting variations you might like to try. I always have plenty of leftover mush, so I lay the cut slices out on a tray that fits in my freezer to keep them separate. Then I stack them up in a bread wrapper. They will keep in the freezer for several months and a couple of frozen slices are easily reheated in the toaster oven, or thawed and pan fried in a little butter.

     

     

    Master Cornmeal Mush

    This thick porridge made from cornmeal is known as Polenta to Italians and gourmet cooks; in Colonial times it was Hasty Pudding; and it’s just Cornmeal Mush to Southern cooks, who also prepare a meatier version called Scrapple. This is a very easy dish to prepare, and it's so versatile that it can be sweet or savory depending on the ingredients. It's eaten as a hot cereal, as a side dish for dinner, or chilled and fried as a crispy bread. Using a pressure cooker makes quick work of this popular dish--no matter what name you prefer.

     

    1 cup yellow cornmeal
    [1/2] teaspoon salt
    1 cup cold water
    3 cups boiling water
    1 tablespoon butter


    Mix the cornmeal, salt, and cold water in a small bowl and set aside. This will keep the meal from getting lumpy when cooked. Bring 3 cups of water to a boil over medium heat in the pressure cooker. Stir the moistened cornmeal into the boiling water and add the butter. Stir constantly over medium-high heat until the mixture begins to bubble. Lock the lid in place. Bring to 15psi over high heat, immediately reduce the heat to the lowest possible setting to stabilize and maintain that pressure, and cook for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and use the cold water release method (see page 000) to depressurize. Carefully open the lid after the pressure drops. Spoon into serving bowls, add your choice of sweetener, and pour in a little milk or cream to taste. Serves 6.


    Variations:


    Breakfast Cornmeal Mush--Before cooking the cornmeal, stir in [1/2] cup chopped fresh or dried fruit, [1/2] cup toasted nuts, and a dash of cinnamon.


    Fried Cornmeal Mush--Pour the hot cornmeal mush into a buttered 8 x 4-inch loaf pan, cover with plastic wrap, and chill overnight or until firm. Turn the loaf out of the pan and cut into 1 inch thick slices. Heat 3 tablespoons butter, bacon drippings, or cooking oil in a small skillet over medium heat, add the slices of cornmeal mush without crowding, and cook each slice until crisp and lightly browned, about 2 minutes on each side. Serve with plenty of butter and a selection of jam, honey, syrup, and molasses, as you would pancakes.


    Cheesy Cornmeal Mush--Add 1[1/2] cups grated sharp cheddar cheese, [1/2] teaspoon ground sage, and [1/2] teaspoon Louisiana hot sauce to the cornmeal mixture after the cooker is depressurized. Stir to mix and cover with a regular lid until the cheese is melted. Serve as a side dish with butter and a sprinkle of chopped green onions.


    Blueberry Cornmeal Mush--Add 2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries. If using drozen berries, defrost them between layers of paper towels to absorb excess liquid. Gently stir the blueberries into the cornmeal after the cooker is depressurized. Serve with milk or cream and sugar.


    Scrapple--After the boiling water is added to the cornmeal, stir in 1 pound cooked pork, diced or shredded (use leftover pork roast, ham or sausage), [1/2] cup minced onion, 1 teaspoon ground sage, [1/2] teaspoon dried thyme, [1/2] teaspoon pepper, and [1/2] teaspoon Louisiana hot sauce.. After the cooker is depressurized, pour the hot cornmeal mush into a buttered loaf pan, cover with plastic wrap, and chill overnight or until firm. Cut into 1 inch thick slices and follow the directions for Fried Cornmeal Mush above.

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    "Wit is educated insolence." Aristotle

  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Kozy, We used to have mush when I was a kid. Haven't had it since .  The cornmeal we had back then seemed to be much coarser ground than what we buy in the stores here now. I wonder if the mush would taste as good? Mom sliced it and fried it in butter and then we would pour syrup over or sometimes just sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon if we had it. My dad put salt and pepper on his and ate it with eggs.

    You know, if groceries keep getting higher, mush is another good food we could put back on our menus. I'm guessing my dh would like it, he grew up back "in the day". LOL

     

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    LP, I have to tell you. I read your post (above) and hung onto every word.

    There is hope for you and me yet. Thank you for the good info and I mean that sincerely.

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    I cook mine in the microwave, less mess and it isn't popping out of the pan when is boiling.  I hate that.

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    AngelCorn Meal Mush

     

    serves 4

     

    1 1/4 cups yellow cornmeal, perferably stone ground

    1 tsp. salt

    1/4 cup all-purpose flour

    1 cup cold water

    3 cups hot water

    oil or bacon fat for frying

    flour for dredging

     

       In a small bowl, combine the cornmeal, salt, and flour. Gradually whisk the cold water into  the mixture. Bring the hot water to a boil in a large saucepan over high heat and gradually whisk in the cornmeal mixture. Stir with the whisk until it boils. Cover, lower heat, and simmer for 5 minutes. The mixture will be very thick. Pour into an oiled 9 inch loaf pan and refrigerate overnight.

       The next day, cut the loaf into 1/2 inch thick slices. In a skillet, heat 2 tsps. of oil. Dredge 3 or 4 slices in the flour and fry them over medium low heat until golden brown on both sides. Continue to cook remaining mush adding oil to the skillet as needed. Serve hot with maple syrup. Plan on 3 or 4 slices per person.

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Lindapearl, loved your email. I unfortuntly don't have a pressure cooker, but will still use the variations next time I make mush. I am from Ohio and both mush and scrapple were popular for breakfast. Thanks for the memories...

    Melanie

     

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Ummm.  We had it a lot growing up, but my mom hated the cooking part.  It spritzes [...there's a Pennsylvamia Dutch word for you...], like lava.  I put a lid on mine & cook it for 30 min., stirring occasionally.  Then pour it in a loaf pan.  I slice it & fry it for breakfast.  I sometimes like to eat it plain.  My DF always liked it with plum jam or Mrs. Butterworth.  We grow & grind our own corn, so it's a cheap & tasty meal.

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  • Re: Corn Meal Mush

    Wink This is great that all of us mush lovers have found each other! Anyone else have a recipe or a story to share?

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