Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy | Taste of Home Community  
Show Subscription Form




Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy

Last post Nov 20, 2008 6:09 AM by _FOOTSIE . 7 replies.


Forum Jump:
Page 1 of 1 (8 items)
  • Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy

     Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy

    Makes about 1 quart.   Published November 1, 2001.

     

    To roast the trimmings and vegetables, it’s best to use a roasting pan that can sit on the stovetop. If you don’t own one, a broiler pan bottom will work; when setting it on the stovetop, however, use medium heat instead of high heat and add only half the amount of chicken broth before scraping up the drippings; add the other half of the chicken broth to the saucepan along with the wine.

     

    Ingredients


     reserved turkey giblets , neck, and backbone, hacked into 2-inch pieces
    1 medium carrot , cut into 1-inch pieces
    1 rib celery , cut into 1-inch pieces
    2 small onions , chopped coarse
    6 cloves garlic , unpeeled 
    3 1/2 cups chicken stock or canned low-sodium chicken broth (two 14 1/2-ounce cans)
    2 cups dry white wine 
    6 sprigs fresh thyme 
    1/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 
     Table salt and ground black pepper 

     

    Instructions


    1. Heat oven to 450 degrees. Place turkey trimmings, carrot, celery, onions, and garlic in large flameproof roasting pan. Spray lightly with cooking spray and toss to combine. Roast, stirring every 10 minutes, until well-browned, 40 to 50 minutes.

     

    2. Remove roasting pan from oven, and place over burner(s) set at high heat; add chicken stock and bring to boil, scraping up browned bits on bottom of pan with wooden spoon.

     

    3. Transfer contents of roasting pan to large saucepan. Add wine, 3 cups water, and thyme; bring to boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer until reduced by half, about 1 1/2 hours. Strain stock into large measuring cup or container. Cool to room temperature; cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until fat congeals, at least 1 hour.

     

    4. To finish gravy, skim fat from stock using soup spoon; reserve fat. Pour stock through fine-mesh strainer to remove remaining bits of fat; discard bits in strainer. Bring stock to simmer in medium saucepan over medium-high heat. In second medium saucepan, heat 4 tablespoons reserved turkey fat over medium-high heat until bubbling; whisk in flour and cook, whisking constantly, until combined and honey-colored, about 2 minutes. Continuing to whisk constantly, gradually add hot stock; bring to boil, then reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper and serve with turkey. (Can be refrigerated up to 3 days; reheat in medium saucepan over medium heat until hot, about 8 minutes.)

    False

     

  • Re: Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy

    Hi-

    Thanks for posting both of these make ahead gravy recipes!

    I do appreciate the help!

    Margaret

    False
  • Re: Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy

    I don't understand this recipe.   Is the turkey giblets and other turkey parts already cooked and then you roast them?.   Also how do you get the backbone out of the turkey.

     

    It seems like if it was already pre-cooked there would not be much flavor left in the turkey parts that you are going to roast for the gravy and I just don't understand how you would get the backbone out of the turkey whether it is already cooked or not.

     

    I hope I am making sense.

     

    p.s    Also is there something you can replace the wine with?   I don't cook with wine. 

    False
  • Re: Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy

    Cook's Illustrated recommends brining your turkey, therefore, you'd take the uncooked giblets out of the bird and roast them. As for the backbone, I'm assuming that this recipe was a tag-a-long to the butterflied turkey recipe they did, as there is no way to cut the backbone out of the bird and still leave the turkey in one piece. Of course, you could probably buy turkey necks, wings and giblets to use in this recipe. I don't know if stores sell the turkey backs like they do the chicken backs.

    False

     

  • Re: Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy

    Footsie thanks for answering my questions.

     

    I just wish I could come up with a good way of making really good turkey gravy.   Sometimes mine turns out ok...not great but ok and then sometimes not.   It seems like I can never make a really good rich tasting turkey gravy.   I guess I'll just have to keep trying.  

    False
  • Re: Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy

    The Woman's Day Make Ahead Gravy has gotten rave reviews over on the Recipe board for several years now. I only posted both versions here for variety and I know that those on Recipes that do make it, aren't about to try anything else.

    False

     

  • Re: Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy

    What is the big deal about making gravy?  It is as simple as falling off of a log.  Take out the extra fat from the roasting pan. Cook the flour in the remaining fat to the degree of brown you like while scraping up all the good brown bits.  Add the liquid and whisk until thick.  Strain it if you like.  Simple.

    False
  • Re: Cook's Illustrated Make Ahead Turkey Gravy

    colleen10

    What is the big deal about making gravy?  It is as simple as falling off of a log.  Take out the extra fat from the roasting pan. Cook the flour in the remaining fat to the degree of brown you like while scraping up all the good brown bits.  Add the liquid and whisk until thick.  Strain it if you like.  Simple.

     

    Not everyone is as talented as you are when it comes to making gravy.

     

    I can make perfect meringue that never runs. A pie crust pretty enough to win awards. Laminated dough for puff pastry and croissants are a breeze. I can make baklava and strudel with my eyes closed. Yeast dough is my best friend and homemade bread and rolls are a staple in my house.

     

    I can debone a whole chicken and never tear the skin. Homemade manicotti, pierogies  and sauce.  Perfectly cooked steak, cold smoked tuna, ribs that will fall off the bone or are tender enough to melt in your mouth yet still let you chew on the bone, if that's your choice. Pot roast, chicken and dumplings or pot pies. Even a perfectly roasted turkey or a spiral sliced ham that's not dry. These are just some of the things that come easily to me.

     

    But I can't or rather don't make gravy. I don't like it. I don't eat it. So I never learned to make it.

     

    Making gravy ahead of time is just one way to help people deal with all the preparations for a big family meal. If it's not for you fine. Don't bother with it. But don't slam people who need help with it or want to get as much done ahead of time so they can enjoy the day instead of spending it in the kitchen.

    False