ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods | Taste of Home Community  
Show Subscription Form




ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods

Last post Nov 13, 2009 1:19 PM by shoppingaddicctAZ . 9 replies.


Forum Jump:
Page 1 of 1 (10 items)
  • ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods

     My niece is originally of Scandinavian origin; she was adopted into our family.  I would like to surprise her with some recipes for typical Scandinavian foods, either holiday foods or everyday foods.  If you are also of Scandinavian descent, can you help me  by giving me some that your family's favorites?

    TIA, Lorraine

    False
  • Re: ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods

    bump for help

    False

  • Re: ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods

     Bump! :>)

    False
  • Re: ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods

    bump for help

    False

  • Re: ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods

    Lorraine - you didn't say which Scandinavian country your niece is from, so I have included some recipes passed down to me from my Norwegian grandmother.  I also have a couple of Swedish recipes and I've included those as well.   Some of the recipes need a specific utensil to make such as a Rosette iron,   Krumkake iron, Sandbakkelse tins, etc.  But, if you really want to impress your niece, these items are relatively inexpensive and will last a long time.

    Lefse

     

    4 c. riced russett potatoes, packed firmly (measure when cold)

    ¼ c. shortening, melted

    2 c. flour, sifted after measuring

    1 tsp. salt

     

    Boil potatoes; rice and add shortening and salt while potatoes are still hot.   Let potatoes become cold – keep in frig 3 ½ hours.  Then cut in flour, as for pastry.  Complete the blending with your hands.  Form a smooth cylindrical roll 2 ½” in diameter.  Slice off discs ¾” thick and roll out on floured pastry cloth with floured lefse rolling pin.  Bake on lefse grill at 500°.  As lefse is baked, stack on top of each other and cover with sheet of waxed paper and a towel on top.

     

     

    Flat Bread

     

    4 c. flour

    1 c. All Bran cereal

    1 c. boiling water

    1 c. buttermilk

    ½ c. shortening

    1 tsp. salt

    1 tsp. baking soda

    2 tsp. baking powder

    ¼ c. sugar

     

    Pour boiling water over All Bran and add shortening to melt.  Stir in dry ingredients.  Roll very thin and place on ungreased cookie sheets.  Bake at 350°.

     

     

     

    Fattigmand Bakkelse

     

    Yolks of 10 eggs

    ½ tsp. cardamon

    1 c. heavy cream

    whites of 2 eggs

    ¾ c. sugar

    Flour

     

    Whip egg whites and mix with other ingredients.  Use as little flour as possible to roll out thin.  Cut and fry in lard till golden brown.

     

     

     

    Krumkake

    1 c. sugar

    3 eggs

    ½ c. butter

    1 ½ c. flour

    ½ c. whipping cream

    ½ tsp. nutmeg

     

    Beat eggs until very light.  Add sugar and nutmeg, melted butter and whipped cream.  Add flour last.  Place one teaspoon of dough on Krumkake iron and bake until very light brown.  Roll quickly on stick to shape into cones.

     

     

     

     

    Rosettes

     

    2 eggs

    1 c. milk

    2 tsp. sugar

    ½ tsp. vanilla

    ¼ tsp. salt 1 c. flour 

     

    Beat eggs.  Add sugar, salt and vanilla, milk and flour.  Mix until smooth.  Heat rosette iron in deep fat, dip in batter, return to hot fat and fry until golden brown.

     

     

     

    Trilbies (Oatmeal Cookies)

     

    1 c. butter

    2 c. flour

    1 c. brown sugar

    ½ c. sour milk

    2 c. oatmeal1 level tsp. soda 

     

    Roll out thin and cut with cookie cutter.  Bake at 350 degrees until just turning brown.  When cool put two cookies together with the following:

     

    1 lb. dates, cut up

    ½ c. water

    1 c. sugar 

     

    Boil together and cool.  If you prefer to serve crisp cookies, do not put in filling until ready to serve.

     

     

    Sandbakkelse

    ¾ c. sugar

    15 almonds, chopped fine

    1 c. butter

    1 tsp. almond extract

    1 egg2 ½ c. flour  

     

    Cream sugar and butter.  Add egg and dry ingredients.  Add flour and mold into Sandbakkels forms.  Bake at 300° till golden brown.                                                                  

     

     

     

    Lutefisk 

    Keep the fish in cold water for three or four hours.  Cut in pieces the size you wish to serve, skin and wash.  Tie in a cheesecloth and place in boiling water to cook for 10-15 minutes until tender.  Serve with butter or white cream sauce.

     

     

    More to follow.

     

    Diana

     

     

    False
    Thought for the day: Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, pee on it and walk away! Click for Manchester, United Kingdom Forecast
  • Re: ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods

     Hi.  I live in Finland, which is technically not a part of Scandinavia, but the foods are similar.  One Ameircan cookbook writer of Finnish descent has written a cookbook called Scandinavian Cooking, published in 1983 by the University of Minnisota Press.  ISBN 0-8166-3876-5.   It has recipes from Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland.  She has also written other books on Scandinavian cuisine.  The recipes are adapted for American ingredients, so they work well.  If you tell what kinds of recipes you are interested in, I am happy to post some.  There are special foods for the holidays, too.

     You can also do an internet search on Scandinavian recipes, or Swedish recipes, Danish, Finnish, Norwegian, Icelandic....I'm sure you can find a lot online.

    lusi

    False
  • Re: ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods

    In looking back over my recipes, some of the directions may seem a little vague if you have never made them before.  Let me know if you have any specific questions, and I'll do my best to describe what Fattigmand (for instance) look like and how to cut them, etc.  Before I add more recipes, I want to pass along a hint my grandmother once passed on to me:  When one of her recipes calls for cream or butter, do not substitute skim milk and margarine.  Some recipes need the fat to make them puffy, etc.  

     

    Diana 

     

    False
    Thought for the day: Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, pee on it and walk away! Click for Manchester, United Kingdom Forecast
  • Re: ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods

    Swedish Meat Balls

     

    1 lb. ground round steak

    1/2 lb. pork sausage

    1 large potato (mashed)

    1/2 c. bread crumbs

    1 Tbsp. sugar

    salt (to taste)

    pepper

    nutmeg (pinch)

    1/2 pint milk

    1 egg

     

    Mix meat, potato, and bread crumbs well.  Add seasoning.  Add sugar and enough hot milk to make mixture soft.  Add well-beaten egg.  Form into small balls, roll in flour, and fry until brown.  Pour rest of milk over meat and cook until done.

     

     

    Swedish Potato Sausage

     

    2 lbs. lean gound pork

    2 lbs. lean ground beef

     

    Grind two meats together twice.

     

    4 medium peeled potatoes

    2 tsp. salt

    pepper

    1 small onion

    allspice

     

    Grind potatoes and onions; mix all ingredients together.  Add cold water until meat mixture is soft.  Either leave as bulk sausage, form into patties, or stuf casings.  To cook, simmer fo 1 1/2 hours.

     

     

    Grandma's Rulle Polse

     

    flank steak

    side pork, sliced

    1 large onion, chopped fine

    ground allspice

    ground thyme

    salt

    pepper

     

    Lay out the flank steak and layer the other ingredients on top.  Fold the flank steak with the fibers of meat going the long way.  Tie the rolled meat tightly with string at 1/2-inch intervals the width of the bundle and 1-2 times the long way.  Soak in a brine of 1/4 c. salt to enough water to cover all and refrigerate up to 36 hours.  Drain the salt brine.

     

    Add the 1/4 tsp. sea salt, 2 bay leaves, 6 or 7 whole allspice and 3 whole cloves to enough water to cover and cook until the meat is tender to a fork, about 1 to 1 ½ hours.  Be sure the water always covers the bundle.  Drain the liquid and press the meat  with heavy even pressure until the meat is cool.  Then refrigerate it.  Slice and serve when cold.

     

     

     

     

     

    Norwegian Almond Bars

     

     

    2 c. flour

    1 c. sugar

    1 c. butter, softened

    1 egg, separated

    1 tsp. cinnamon

    12 tsp. salt

    1 c. sliced almonds

     

     

     

     

    Preheat oven to 350°.   Combine flour, sugar, butter, egg yolk, cinnamon and salt.  Beat at low speed until well mixed, 2 to 3 minutes.  Divide dough into halves.  Press each half onto an ungreased cookie sheet to a 1/16th inch thickness. In a small bowl, beat the egg white with a fork until foamy. Spread the egg white over the dough; sprinkle with nuts. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until very lightly browned. Immediately cut into 2-inch squares and remove from pan. Cool completely.

     

     

     

     

      Julekake (Norwegian Christmas Bread) 2 pkg. dry yeast 1/2 c. warm water 1 tsp. sugar 1 c. milk, scalded 1/2 c. butter 1 egg beaten 1/2 c. sugar 1/2 tsp. salt 3/4 tsp. cardamom approx. 5 c. flour 1/2 c. citron 1/2 c. candied cherries 1/2 c. white raisins  Dissolve yeast and a little sugar in warm water. Scald milk then add butter. Cool to lukewarm. Add egg and yeast to the milk, butter mixture. Add sugar, salt, and cardamom. Beat in 2 c. flour and mix well. Mix fruit with a little of the remaining flour so it doesn't stick together and add. Stir in rest of flour.   Knead on floured cloth until smooth. Place in greased bowl. Cover and let rise until doubled. Divide into two parts and form round loaves. Put on greased cookie sheets. Let rise until nearly double. Bake at 350° for 30 to 40 minutes. While still warm, brush with soft butter or decorate with powdered sugar icing mixed with almond flavoring. Decorate with candied cherries and almond, ,if desired.

     

     

     

    Hope you find something that sounds good.  Diana

       

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    False
    Thought for the day: Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, pee on it and walk away! Click for Manchester, United Kingdom Forecast
  • Re: ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods

    Bump for Lorraine

    False
    Thought for the day: Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, pee on it and walk away! Click for Manchester, United Kingdom Forecast
  • Re: ISO: Recipes for Scandinavian Foods
    Thank you, Everyone, The recipes sound marvelous. I'll print them all and make a book of them. Will also search the net, that's a great suggestion. We don't know which Scandinavian country is my niece's heritage so all the countries are welcome. Are there any foods typical to the area that are easy and you serve on weekdays? Those would be most welcome, also. I know the Scandinavian author you referred to: Bea Ojakangas (not sure how to spell last name). She's great! I don't know if her books are still available, however. Thanks again, everyone! Lorraine
    False