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Canning applesauce question

Last post Oct 20, 2004 9:00 AM by enjoynature . 4 replies.


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  • Canning applesauce question
    Can anyone tell me why my canned applesauce turns brown around the top of the jar after it sits on the shelf awhile? It just about always does this and I like to keep my applesauce as pretty as it was when I canned it :) TIA, Donna
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  • RE: Canning applesauce question
    I don't know but I'm curious to know why too. I wonder if you added some ascorbic acid to the sauce before you can it if that would help. I use it in my peaches when freezing and they don't turn brown.
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    Cathy "What Contemptible Scoundrel Stole The Cork From My Lunch" --- W.C. Fields
  • RE: Canning applesauce question
    bump
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  • RE: Canning applesauce question
    Q. What makes canned foods change color?

    A. Oxidation may cause foods to darken at the tops of jars. Oxidation is from air in the jars or too little heating or processing to destroy enzymes. Overprocessing may cause discolored foods throughout the containers. Pink and blue colors sometimes seen in canned pears, apples, and peaches are caused by chemical changes in the coloring matter of the fruit. Iron and copper from cooking utensils (or from water in some localities) may cause brown, black, and gray colors in some foods. When canned corn turns brown, the discoloring may be due to the variety of the corn, to stage of ripeness, to overprocessing, or to copper or iron pans. Packing liquid may dissolve coloring materials from the foods.

    Q. Is it safe to eat discolored canned foods?

    A. The color changes noted do not mean the food is unsafe to eat. Spoilage, however, may also cause color changes. Before you use any canned food that has an unusual color, examine carefully.

    Q. Why is headspace important in canning?

    A. Headspace is the distance between the surface of food and the underside of the lid. This space allows for the expansion of food solids or bubbling up of liquid during processing. If headspace is not adequate, some food in the container will be forced out, leaving food particles or syrup on the sealing surface and preventing a seal. When too much headspace is allowed, some air may remain in the jar after processing, causing food at the top of the jar to darken. Adequate headspace allows a vacuum to form during the processing of the food.

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  • RE: Canning applesauce question
    Q. There is mold on the surface of my home-canned tomatoes, applesauce, and jelly. Is it all right to remove the mold and use the food?

    A. Discard any home-canned food with mold on or in the food. It could be dangerous. It is possible for mold growing on the surface to lower the acidity of the food. If the food becomes low enough in acid, botulism-producing bacteria can start to grow and produce toxin. Even if the mold is scraped off the surface, the toxin remains in the food. Molds, too, produce toxin so that the food should be discarded.
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