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Yogurt from scratch

Last post Feb 17, 2005 5:11 PM by Graingirl . 10 replies.


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  • Yogurt from scratch
    I recently aquired an ancient looking "Salton" brand yogurt machine. It has 5 seperate cups to make the yogurt in, and it looks like you just fill the containers and plug it in. Unfortunately, it doesn't come with any instructions, as they were probably lost years ago. I've e-mailed the Salton company and they haven't gotten back to me in about 3 months.

    Does anyone know anything about making yogurt from scratch? I need recipes and directions. Thank you so much!
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  • RE: Yogurt from scratch
    Copy & paste this into your browser, I also bumped the post up for you.


    http://bbs.reimanpub.com/bulletinboard.asp?view=reply&threadnum=170793&catnum=
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  • RE: Yogurt from scratch
    First, buy a yak.

    Second, learn how to milk (as in milking a cow), if you don't already know.
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  • RE: Yogurt from scratch
    1. Find a box of Yogourmet freeze-dried yogurt starter and follow the instructions on the box. Check your health food store, or check the Internet. This is the simplest.

    2. You can also make it with a multitude of milk types and some plain yogurt that has live cultures in it. Check on the side of the container. The brand I'd suggest is Stonyfield Farm (usually found at health food stores). It has six live, active cultures. There are only two bacteria (active cultures) common to Stonyfield Farm yogurt and other yogurts. You can also freeze this yogurt in user-friendly amounts to culture future batches of yogurt.

    3. Get an instant read thermometer. They are available in most places that has a kitchen gadget division - your grocery store, Wal-Mart, etc... Temperature is critical to making yogurt. There is a window of temperature where you add the culture. If you want tart yogurt, add it towards the warmest end of this temperature window. If you want mild yogurt, add the culture at the cooler end of the temp. window.

    I'll post some recipes in another post. I'm probably running out of room here.
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  • RE: Yogurt from scratch
    Faith, sorry about the yak comment. You deserve better than that and I should have not been so flippant in response to what was (and is) a sincere question. Please accept my genuine apology if you can find it in your heart to do so.
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  • RE: Yogurt from scratch
    I bumped up Cubbybear's Crockpot Yogurt because that's what I've been doing. It makes about 5 quarts. I love it very much!
    Amy
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  • RE: Yogurt from scratch
    Whole-Milk Yogurt

    1 quart whole milk
    3 T. plain yogurt, room temperature

    Pour milk in a 2-quart saucepan (you can also do this step in a 4-cup measuring cup in the microwave - it takes about 8 minutes). Heat the milk to 190°F (90°C). This is done to pasteurize the milk. Even if you are using store-bought milk that has been pasteurized already, there are all kinds of bacteria in milk (you know this when milk sours), so make sure you don't skip this step. Souring/rotting and fermentation are two entirely different things.

    Remove from heat and cool to a temperature between 108°-112°F (42°-44°C). You may want to pull the protein film from the top of the milk at this point. I set my pan/measuring cup in the kitchen sink filled with cold water. I also add some of those blue ice thingys to chill the water even more quickly.

    Have the 3 T. of plain yogurt in a glass 1-cup measuring and at room temperature (probably 20-30 minutes out of the refrigerator). Add a small amount (about 1/3 cup - just guess, this isn't chemistry class at this point) of the cooled milk to the yogurt and mix together. Then stir the yogurt-milk mixture into the remaining milk. Mix well, but don't beat it.

    I'm not sure if a Salton needs water or not, look them up on the Internet and you may even find the yogurt making instructions. My Yogourmet requires warm water to incubate the yogurt. I start warming my water/machine when I put the milk in the sink to cool so it's the correct temperature when the yogurt/milk is ready.

    Incubate anywhere from 4-6 hours. Check it after 4 and see if it has reached the firmness you want. It will be a little less firm at this stage than after it has been refrigerated for several hours.

    Do not move or bump the yogurt maker once you have everything in place. This will cause the clabber to separate.

    I'll post some more helpful hints you probably won't find anywhere else. I'll also post some more recipes, but right now, I have bread dough that probably needs punched down.
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  • RE: Yogurt from scratch
    Graingirl - You seem to know what you're doing. Have you ever heard of adding some powdered milk to the mix?
    Seems I remember that - to get thicker consistency. I used to have the Salton yogurt maker, but who knows where it is stored??
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  • RE: Yogurt from scratch
    Oh wow, thank you so much everyone for the quick response.

    "Homestyle", you have a Salton yogurt maker. How exactly do you make yogurt in it? (My instructions were lost before I got the machine.)
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  • RE: Yogurt from scratch
    mojazz - I've made lots of yogurt and have had 3 different yogurt makers over about 30 years. For the past few months I've only made kefir with real kefir grains - much easier than yogurt making and much better for you.

    There's a neverending assortment of recipes. I add non-fat dry milk powder when I use low-fat milk (goat milk) and want to get a firm or very firm yogurt.

    For firm yogurt using 2 quarts whole milk: add 1/2 c. powdered milk powder, for very firm yogurt: add 1 c. milk powder.

    Firm yogurt using 2 qts. 2% milk - add 1/2 c. of milk powder AND 1 pkg. of unflavored gelatin - for very firm add 1 c. of milk powder and 1 pkg. of gelatin.



    You can even make FAT-FREE YOGURT:

    1 quart water
    2 c. instant nonfat dry milk powder
    3 T. plain yogurt, room temperature

    Heat water to 120°F (49°C). Add dry milk powder and stir until dissolved. In a small bowl, stir yogurt until creamy. Mix about 1/3 c. warm milk into yogurt. Stir yogurt-milk mixture into milk. Mix well. Incubate 3-4 hours. After 3 hours, remove cover and gently shake mixture to see if it is firm. If not, let stand 1 more hour and check again. Refrigerate as soon as yogurt is set. Chill at least 6 hours before serving. Makes about 1 quart.

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  • RE: Yogurt from scratch
    Yogurt hints and tips:

    You can use any kind of milk, including evaporated, sweetened condensed, whipping cream, goat, non-fat dry milk powder....and yes, even yak and mares milk.

    Recipes are plentiful by doing a search on Google for - Yogurt Recipes.

    If you add unflavored gelatin to a recipe, it makes it more like the Swiss-style yogurt.

    Using whipping cream gets a wonderfully thick and rich yogurt that is great as a dessert with fruit on the top, or granola (mmmmmmmmm).

    Recipes using cornstarch in them will make a smoother and creamier yogurt.

    To control the taste:
    The temperature of the milk when the starter is added and the length of incubation time both influence the taste.

    The warmer the milk is within the range when the starter is added, the more tart the yogurt will be. The cooler the milk, the sweeter the yogurt. Long incubation time results in tart yogurt. Short incubation produces a sweet yogurt. Yogurt also becomes more tart the longer it's stored.

    If you stir your yogurt after it's been in the refrigerator, you will break up the curd and it may begin to separate. The liquid that you see separate out is whey. Lots of uses for this. So the best way to keep it "solid" is to scoop out what you need without disturbing it anymore than necessary.
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