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water bath vs. inversion method for jams and jelly

Last post Aug 16, 2005 11:37 AM by GrandmaCookN . 7 replies.


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  • water bath vs. inversion method for jams and jelly
    Hi again,
    I'm really getting into this preserving thing. LOL
    But i have been using the inversion method (turning the hot jars upside down) for my jams. Haven't had a canner/kettle big enough, to do water processing.
    but decided to call the extension service regarding kinds of apples for the sure jel apple butter, and she kind of freaked out that i was using the inversion method. These directions are in the directions that come with the pectin packets.
    anyhow, she said it wasn't safe. double checked a PhD. at MSU and they said the same thing.
    so...my question...do any of you do that with your jams/jellies? Or is everyone strictly hot water bath?
    i am thinking of my dozens of jars on the shelf that may be bad...
    haven't made my apple butter yet. thinking (since i borrowed my friends canner) that maybe i will do the water bath for it. then i may just use a different recipe all together.
    sorry this is long, thanks for listening.


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  • RE: water bath vs. inversion method for jams and jelly
    I have done both methods with no problems. Maybe it depends on what fruits you use. Of course as germs and bacteria change maybe methods have to change too. I also do lots of freezer jams.
    I do have a jar of cherry jam sitting on the counter right now waiting to be opened that was done the inversion way.
    Haven't died from them yet! Smile!!!!
    ~~Leisa~~
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  • RE: water bath vs. inversion method for jams and jelly
    I haven't made jams or jellies for several years, but when I had plenty of blackberries and made lots of jelly out of them, I used Sure-Jel for my pectin.

    I never gave them a water bath either. The jars that I poured the jelly in was in a pan of boiling water, and the caps and rings were in a separate pan. I ladled the jelly into sterilized hot jars, and put the sterlized lids on them. I made a lot of them, and I'm still alive and healthy at 67.

    If the lids do not pop and the centers go down, then you will know that they did not get a proper seal. Also, if you open a jar and it has started to mold, they you know it is bad. Just remember our mothers and grandma's made a lot of jellies with just wax as sealers.

    Margaret

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    If your spirit is grateful and humble / your tongue won't constantly grumble.
  • RE: water bath vs. inversion method for jams and jelly
    I just made batches of black raspberry and strawberry jam yesterday! I have always used SureJell and the inversion method. I, too, noticed that it was included in the SureJell directions. I don't think I ever saw that before. I have NEVER had a problem with this method and have been using it since my MIL taught me to make jelly and jam 20-odd years ago. Of course, if the top doesn't pop down and stay down, I put the jar in the fridge (has only happened to me once). I always look the jars over really well before using, but of course you wouldn't ever eat anything that looked funny. I also use the inversion method for pickles and relishes.
    False
  • RE: water bath vs. inversion method for jams and jelly
    Have never done a water bath with Jams, jellies or preserves.
    Am very careful to sterilize jars, lids and rings. Then sit on dry towel out of a draft after they are filled and sealed and wait for the "ping". If one doesn't then put it into fridge to use then now.
    Have never used pectin in my apple butter either. Will have to check the package for their recipe.
    Have you checked out the apple butter thread in search yet? There are several really good recipes in it. One for apple butter prepared in a slow cooker. Seems several have made it and liked it. I have a good one using apple cider along with the apples. Will see if I can find it for you. Been awhile since we had some good homemade apple butter.
    Nancy
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    Blessed are those that can give without remembering and take without forgetting.

  • RE: water bath vs. inversion method for jams and jelly
    I sometimes wonder if these safety precautions (water bath) are for those who aren't as careful (and clean) as they could be. If you are extra careful with your canning and very clean and used sterilized jars and lids, I think it is safe. JMHO.....but if you tend to be sloppy and not watch what you are doing, better water bath it and kill those germs.
    The news that your dish cloth is the dirtiest item in your house and the kitchen sink is germier than the toilet is not news to me. I will change dish clothes two of three times a day when canning. And everything gets scrubbed and bleached! My MIL was not so careful and we were all hesitant to eat some of her food because of this.
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  • RE: water bath vs. inversion method for jams and jelly
    Sugar IS a preservative.
    I agree with CookieCarol's points. Some people are most careful & others not. The general guidlines have to cover all cases.
    False
  • RE: water bath vs. inversion method for jams and jelly
    Hello again,
    I posted on the main board the recipe I have used for years for apple butter. Not hard to do and very good. Its under Apple butter from Grandmacookn.

    Nancy
    False

    Blessed are those that can give without remembering and take without forgetting.