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Grape jelly from home grown grapes?

Last post Aug 19, 2005 2:56 PM by Roselle . 5 replies.


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  • Grape jelly from home grown grapes?
    My DH wants me to try and make some jelly from grapes he has grown. I did a search and found one recipe that says clean grapes and boil down and stain then add sugar. Nothing about how much water or if I'm to use sure jel? Need an easy recipe with directions any help would be nice.Easy is the key word on this. Thanks!
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  • RE: Grape jelly from home grown grapes?
    I made grape jelly once and if recall correctly it was just the juice from the grapes and sugar.
    It was kind of a funny story and I have never made it again. I was young and ended up with a full canner of jelly and ended up using every jar in the house to can it in,including a gallon pickle jar. Rose
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  • RE: Grape jelly from home grown grapes?
    Be sure to add some lemon juice. It really enhances the flavor of the grapes.
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  • RE: Grape jelly from home grown grapes?
    Hi: I have made grape jelly often. I believe the recipe is on the Certo box. Stephanie
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  • RE: Grape jelly from home grown grapes?
    I've been making my own jelly from the grapes I grow in my back yard for years.

    Yes, Concord grapes are the best grapes for jelly.

    You want to pick the grapes, wash well. Cook with a little liquid until the skins, flesh and seeds all start to separate from each other. At that point, place a colander over a large bowl. Place a piece of washed muslin in the colander. Ladle in the grape 'stuff' in the pan. pull up the corners of the muslin and tie. Hang over the bowl for several hours so all the juice drips through. You don't want to squeeze the bag, or you'll get cloudy jelly. Once the bag has totally dripped out, put the juice in the fridge for at least overnight. Next day, you'll need to strain it to get rid of the tartrate crystals that have formed overnight. I use a strainer lined with a paper towel or coffee filter to make sure I get even the tiniest crystals.

    From that point, I'd recommend using the instructions inside the box of Sure Jel. Or you can call your county extension home economist if you're in the US, to get an approved recipe. Thing is, you have to measure very carefully, and follow the procedure precisely or you may not get jelly, but just very sweet grape juice.

    Have fun--I love making jelly--the whole neighborhood smells like the Welch's factory moved in. I'm thinking this year, I may cook the juice over the grill out back to keep the house a little cooler. One thing I generally do at grape harvest time--I prepare the juice, but after I've strained out the tartrate crystals, I often put it in plastic soda bottles and pop into the freezer so I can make the jelly later, when the weather has cooled down some.

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