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OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner

Last post Oct 01, 2010 3:44 PM by dutchmom4MI . 156 replies.


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  • OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    IT'S PARTY TIME. On September 17, the mayor of Munich officially opened the world's largest festival by tapping the first keg of Oktoberfest beer with the words "O'Zapft is!" meaning "The keg has been tapped!"

    At noontime, 12pm, the lord Mayor of Munich had the honor of tapping the first keg of Oktoberfest beer. Once the barrel was tapped, all visitors were then allowed to quench their thirst. The festival will last until October 3, 2005.

    So come on in to the Oktoberfest party tent at the German Corner and share recipes, remembrances, and more. Prosit!
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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Why is Oktoberfest called "Oktober" fest when it actually begins in September?

    The first Oktoberfest was held in the year 1810 in honor of the Bavarian Crown Prince Ludwig’s marriage to Princess Therese von Sachsen-Hildburghausen. The festivities began on October 12, 1810 and ended on October 17th with a horse race. In the following years, the celebrations were repeated and, later, the festival was prolonged and moved forward into September.

    By moving the festivities up, it allowed for better weather conditions. Because the September nights were warmer, the visitors were able to enjoy the gardens outside the tents and the stroll over “die Wiesen” or the fields much longer without feeling chilly. Historically, the last Oktoberfest weekend was in October and this tradition continues into present times.
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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    The Munich Oktoberfest in September and October is probably Europe's biggest festival in terms of attendance. There is jolly band music and merry crowds in the vast, elaborately decorated beer halls.

    The fare, in addition to liter mugs of beer, includes roasted oxen, roasted chicken, roasted venison, pigs' knuckles, sausages by the ton and big white radishes cut in fancy forms.

    Outside, the crowds mingle at the Ferris wheels, bumper cars, spooky houses, merry-go-rounds and food stands.
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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Beer-Basted Sausage with Caramelized Onions and German Mustard

    8 sausages, such as bratwurst, knackwurst or wieners
    4 oz. Oktoberfest beer
    2 oz. hot Dusseldorf mustard
    3 oz. canola oil
    16 oz. yellow onion, peeled, quartered and sliced very thin

    Place canola oil in a large nonstick skillet (12-in. diameter) and add the sliced onions. Saute over low heat, stirring often, until onions are golden brown, soft and caramelized. Do not let burn.

    Season to taste with salt and pepper, and stir in the hot Dusseldorf mustard. Set aside.

    Prepare a grill, and cook sausages, basting with Oktoberfest beer every minute or so.

    Serve the grilled sausages with the mustard-seasoned onions.

    (Note: you may prefer the traditional sauerkraut, which is delicious when heated with whole brown mustard seeds)
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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Thanks to Bagelbaker we finally have a T&T recipe for Pretzel Rolls. Requests for these rolls pop up occasionally.

    Posted by: bagelbaker
    PRETZEL ROLLS -- (this may look like a lot of work, but honestly, it took me only ½ hour (not counting rising or baking time)

    1 ¼ tsp dry yeast
    1 ¼ C. warm water
    3 ¼ C. flour
    2 tsp salt
    ¼ C. butter-softened
    1/8 C. baking soda
    2 TBS sugar
    1 egg white, well beaten, set aside
    course pretzel salt or “crazy mixed up salt”

    mix yeast in ¼ c. warm water and set aside.

    Put flour, salt, butter, water, and yeast mixture.

    in mixing bowl, using dough hook, knead well.

    Grease a baking sheet (I like airbake for these. Divide dough and roll into balls (we like smaller
    rolls, so we made 16 balls) Place on baking sheet.

    Flatten each slightly and using a serrated knife, cut criss-cross on top of each one. (I used kitchen
    shears and snipped the cross on top). Cover with damp towel and set aside to rise double (about ½ hr).

    Preheat oven to 375.

    Put 4 cups water, 2 TBS sugar and 1/8 C. baking soda in an alum. skillet with deep sides. Bring to a boil. Boil about 4 at a time for 30 seconds per side, using a slotted
    spoon to remove and place back on the baking sheet. Brush each one with the egg white and sprinkle with course salt or crazy mixed up salt.

    Bake approx 15 min for small rolls (16 of them) or 25 min for the larger ones (8 of them)


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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    The Oktoberfest parade takes place on the third Saturday in September, opening the two-week festival. Beer wagons lead the two-hour parade, with six different breweries represented every year.

    Trailing the beer wagons are marksmen, hunters, floats and bands. Historical groups, guilds in medieval costumes and crossbow societies also march in the parade.

    Horse drawn wagons, decorated with colorful streamers, deliver the barrels of beer to the huge tents that are set up to hold at least 3,000 people and a 30-piece band each. Girls on top of the wagons throw flowers to the crowds as they make their deliveries.

    The German beer is served in heavy, one-liter mugs, making the action of bringing a mug to the mouth equal to a five-pound biceps curl! That is why in every tent you will find 12 very strong German women carrying steins of beer.

    Plenty of food accompanies the various beers that are available. Some of the favorite foods at the feast include various sausages, sauerkraut, cheese, roasted chicken, salted radishes, strudels, potatoes and giant pretzels that can be worn around the neck to snack on now and then, Chocolate in different kinds of packages, sizes and shapes is a favorite treat, and booths offer chocolate hearts and horseshoes as well as gingerbread hearts with attached ribbons so that they, like pretzels, can be worn around the neck.

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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Hazelnut-Pink Peppercorn Crusted Veal Slices with Oktoberfest-Brown Butter Glaze

    8 slices veal scallopine (total weight about 1 lb.)
    1/2 cup whole hazelnuts, skins on
    1 tablespoon pink peppercorns
    1/4 cup minced parsley
    1 tablespoon flour

    Glaze:
    3 oz. salted butter
    2 oz. Oktoberfest beer

    Place hazelnuts, pink peppercorns, parsley and flour in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel cutting blade. Pulverize into a coarse meal.

    Press the seasoned nut-flour blend into the surface of the sliced veal, coating both sides of each slice. Place a nonstick skillet (8-10 inches diameter, to accommodate the width of each slice) over medium heat, and sear each slice of veal, until the nut-flour crust is golden brown. Do not cook through, but place each browned slice in a shallow baking dish.

    After browning all the veal slices, place in 300 degree F. oven for 4-10 minutes, to cook through (depends on thickness of veal slices; a 1/4-inch thick slice should cook through in just 4-5 minutes).

    Prepare the glaze: brown the butter in the same saute skillet, and pour through a fine mesh sieve to remove any browned bits. Whisk in the Oktoberfest beer, stirring constantly until an emulsion forms, and pour over the veal slices in the baking dish. Return to oven to warm through, season with salt if desired, and serve with spatzle or buttered noodles.
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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Roast Chicken (Brathuhn)

    young chicken
    mixed herbs
    salt & pepper
    meat stock or brandy
    flour

    Divide chicken into quarters, rub with salt; lay in a casserole with melted butter. Roast until tender, basting from time to time with meat stock or brandy. Take the breast and wings from the pan 10 mins. before the legs.

    Thicken the pan juices with a little flour, season with salt & pepper and a few mixed herbs and cook for 5 mins.

    Serve the sauce either separately or over the chicken.
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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Before reading about the white carved radish at Oktoberfest, I bought some at Central Market yesterday. I'm wondering if anyone here can tell me more about the tradition of carving them and how it relates to Oktoberfest. I am not finding much about it on the net and nothing in my German cookbooks. Anyone???

    Radi (Rettich)/Radieschen (Radieserl) (Radish

    The large white radish is cut like an accordion, salted, and sold a large plate, whereas red radishes (if available) are eaten whole. Both make great finger food and are an integral part of the beer garden experience.
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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Beer Soup (Biersuppe)

    This surprising soup recipe is perfect for cool-weather suppers and using up any leftover Oktoberfest beer. For those who don't consider beer a proper ingredient, inform them that in Bavaria, beer is officially recognized as a food product -- it must be available at all times, even in the event of war! In fact, the Bavarian Purity Law from 1516 is the oldest food law in the world. It declares that, "only barley, hops and water should be taken and used."

    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    4 cups beer
    Pinch salt
    Pinch nutmeg
    Pinch ginger
    Pinch cinnamon
    4 egg yolks
    1 tablespoon sugar
    1 cup dry white wine
    Grated peel of 1 lemon

    Melt the butter in a large saucepan. Stirring constantly to avoid lumps, gradually blend in the flour and cook over moderately low heat until the flour is golden.

    Still stirring, slowly pour in the beer. Add the salt, nutmeg, ginger and cinnamon. Simmer gently for 20 minutes.

    While the beer is simmering, beat the egg yolks well in a bowl. Add the sugar, then beat in the white wine and the grated lemon peel.
    Drop by drop, beat 1/4 cup of the hot beer into the egg mixture.
    Gently stir the egg and beer mixture into the remaining hot beer. Heat through, making sure the soup remains below the simmering point. Taste and correct seasoning, if necessary.

    Guten Appetit!

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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Of all the countries in Europe, Germany is the one with the longest tradition of flat, shaped gingerbreads. At every autumn fair in Germany, and in the surrounding lands where the Germanic influence is strong, there are rows of stalls filled with hundreds of gingerbread hearts, decorated with white and colored icing and tied with ribbons.

    German Gingerbread Cookies

    1/2 cup dark molasses
    1/2 cup butter or margarine
    1/4 cup brown sugar (packed)
    2 cups all-purpose flour
    2 teaspoons ground ginger
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1/2 teaspoon each cloves, nutmeg and salt
    2/3 cup ground California pistachios
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    1 large egg
    1 egg yolk, beaten with 2 teaspoons water

    Combine molasses with butter and sugar in saucepan; heat, stirring just until butter melts. (Don’t boil.) Cool.

    In a separate bowl, mix flour, spices, salt, ground pistachios and baking powder. Add egg and cooled syrup mixture and blend to a dough.
    When ready to bake, preheat oven to 375*F (190*C).

    Roll out dough into two (12-inch) rounds and cut out holiday shapes (Oktoberfest hearts) with cookie cutters. Place cookies on ungreased cookie sheets, leaving 1/2-inch between them. Brush with egg yolk-water mixture.

    Bake for 10 minutes or until light golden at edges. Cool on wire racks.
    Makes 30 (3-inch) cookies.

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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Icing for Gingerbread Hearts

    1 pound confectioners' sugar
    1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
    3 egg whites

    In a medium bowl, sift together confectioners' sugar and cream of tartar. Blend in egg whites. Using an electric mixer on high speed, beat for about 5 minutes, or until mixture is thick and stiff. Keep covered with a moist cloth until ready to frost cookies.

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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Oktoberfest Entertaining Recipes

    Currant-Glazed Pork Tenderloin with Red Cabbage & Thyme Dumplings

    This cozy, flavorful meal is perfect for a cool fall evening.

    Serves: 6

    Ingredients
    1/3 cup + 1 tablespoon German red or black currant jelly
    1 tablespoon Bavarian beer vinegar or white German vinegar
    1 (2-pound) pork tenderloin
    Salt and pepper
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    3 cups drained German pickled red cabbage
    1 (6.8-ounce) box Bavarian potato dumpling mix
    2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves, plus thyme sprigs to garnish

    Preparation
    For tenderloin:
    Preheat oven to 425° F. In a small bowl, combine 1/3 cup currant jelly and vinegar, and set aside.

    Season tenderloin all over with salt and pepper, and rub with olive oil. Place on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Roast 20 minutes. Spoon some glaze over tenderloin. Roast until a meat thermometer inserted in the center of tenderloin registers 160° F., about 15 more minutes. Remove from oven, spoon with remaining glaze and cover with foil. Let stand 15 minutes before slicing.

    For red cabbage:
    While pork is roasting, place cabbage in a saucepan on low heat. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until hot throughout; stir in 1 tablespoon currant jelly.

    For potato dumplings:
    While pork is roasting, prepare dumpling mix according to package directions, stirring in fresh thyme before cooking. (Most mixes require 5 to 10 minutes to prepare and 20 minutes to boil.)

    To serve, slice tenderloin and arrange on a platter. Top pork with red cabbage and garnish with fresh thyme sprigs. Serve dumplings in a separate bowl.

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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Our Shepherd Lutheran Church
    Oktoberfest Recipes

    Möhren Kasserolle (Carrot Casserole)

    ¼ lb dried white beans (soak overnight or quick method below)
    1 ½ lbs carrots
    1 lb. Potatoes (about 4 or 5 medium)
    2 tbls margarine
    2 medium onions
    2 cups vegetable broth/bouillon
    2 tbls chopped parsley
    salt and pepper


    Wash and prepare beans by soaking 12-24 hours or quick method (Heat to boiling the beans and 2 cups water. Remove from heat and let soak 1 hour). Cook beans in the same water for about 1 hour. Add more water as required.

    Wash and peel carrots and potatoes. Slice or chop both. (I used a salad shooter and sliced the vegetables, which worked very well). Peel and dice the onions. In a large pot or dutch oven, sauté onions in melted butter until tender. Add the carrots, potatoes, parsley, salt, pepper, and vegetable broth. Cook over medium-high heat until vegetables are done - about 30 to 40 minutes. Add drained beans to the vegetable mixture, and pour all into a casserole dish for serving.

    Makes about 1 ½ quart casserole dish.

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  • RE: OKTOBERFEST TIME!!! - Recipes & More at Die Deutsche Ecke (The German/American/Czech Corner
    Goulashe Soup

    1 lb. Onions (about 4 medium size yellow onions)
    4 large green peppers
    2 28 oz. Cans of peeled whole tomatoes
    1 ½ lbs. beef, cut into small cubes (round steak is fine)
    1 can tomato paste
    salt & pepper
    1 tbls. ground red paprika
    1 tsp carraway
    1 tsp marjoram
    2 quarts water
    a few dashes of tabasco sauce
    1 or 2 packets brown gravy mix


    Finely chop onions. Cut the peppers into thin strips (I also cut the strips in half). Dice tomatoes, reserving liquid from the can.

    Brown the beef in oil on all sides in a large pot or dutch oven. (You will need a big pot). Add onions, peppers and tomatoes and continue to cook with the meat for a few minutes. Add the reserved liquid from the canned tomatoes, 2 quarts of water, and the tomato paste. Add paprika, carraway and majoram. Also add salt and pepper to taste (I used a generous amount of pepper). Finally, add tabasco sauce. Simmer all for 45 minutes. Add more spices as required based on you own taste test. Add one packet of gravy mix to thicken the soup. Use the second packet as required.

    This recipe can be prepared a day in advance. In this case, it should be thickened just before it is served (please do this at home).

    I've tested this recipe and it is very good. The result is a very tasty, mild, goulash soup. It can be made spicier by adding more tabasco sauce.

    If you have any questions about the recipe please call Lynn Tuozzo at 410-315-9872.

    Yield: About 20-25 ladles of soup.



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