?? About Meyer Lemons??? | Taste of Home Community  
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?? About Meyer Lemons???

Last post Jun 04, 2007 5:53 PM by peppercorns . 12 replies.


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  • ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    I've seen on the Food Network (various shows) people speak about Meyer Lemons. I don't know anything about them, has anyone every tried them, are they hard to find, what time of year do you get them?

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Barb
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  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    Scientists believe the Meyer lemon is a hybrid, a cross between a regular lemon and either an orange or a mandarin. They’re sometimes smaller than a regular lemon, rounder in shape, with a thin, soft, and smooth rind which ranges from greenish when slightly immature to a rich yellow-orange when fully ripe. The rind lacks the typical lemon peel oil aroma and the pulp is darker yellow and less acidic than a regular lemon. The complex flavor and aroma hints of sweet lime, lemon and mandarin.

    Like most citrus, Meyer lemons originated in China where they have been grown for at least several hundred years. Frank Meyer, a plant explorer for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, found them growing near Peking and introduced them to the U.S. in 1908. Today, most are grown in California’s Central Valley, south of Fresno and in the Sacramento Valley. A few growers in northern San Diego County sell mainly to organic and farmers’ markets. They’re also grown in Texas and Florida. Peak season in most areas is November, December, and January, but can extend to April.

    Look for a rich orange-yellow rind which indicates a fruit that was allowed to ripen fully before harvest so it will be succulent, juicy and aromatic. Look for a bright, shiny specimen. After a few days they begin to shrivel and the rinds become hard and dry but they’re usually fine inside.

    Use it for most purposes as you would a regular lemon. It’s perfect for a soufflé or lemon tart and, because it’s sweeter than a regular lemon, makes good lemonade requiring less sugar. On the other hand, when you want a more acidic lemon taste, as in a vinaigrette or marinade, you’re probably better off using a regular lemon.

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  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    Thanks so much for the brief history and information.

    Barb
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  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    you are welcome, asked for a nickle and got a quarter didn't ya lol
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  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    I love Meyer lemons. I eat them like oranges. But then I eat ruby red grapefruit that way too. Carol
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    Carol

  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    Here's the low-down on Meyers lemons. I have a Meyers lemon tree in my backyard along with oranges and grapefruit. I start getting lemons in December, not a whole lot at first. Starting in January, they are real plentiful. I have a whole tree full of ripe lemons right now. They are larger than the dinky ones in stores, a little sweetner, but still sour, very fragerant lemony smell, and quite juicy. I have so many that besides giving them to neighbors and friends, I juice them and freeze them in ice cube trays. Then when frozen, I pop them out and bag them for the freezer. They are also a bright yellow with smooth skin. If you get some you're in for a real treat.

    Lou in Florida
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  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    I've been looking in the stores for them. All they have up by me (Rockland County, NY 35 miles north of NYC) are the dinky, shriveled yellow ones. Even looked in our most "gourmet" shopping store, but nothing.

    Will keep looking ... and thanks for the replies everyone!!!

    Barb

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  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    The trouble is that Meyer Lemons do not keep well, and do not ship well. You can get them here in California, espec. if you have a tree, or have a friend with a tree. They are wonderful, sweet/tangy, make a wonderful "Lemon Drop" if you like vodka martinis. They are also fab in cooking. But it will be a hassle for you to find them where you are... Sorry about that.
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    "I try to avoid serving inedible substances to my guests." VinnyD
  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    Thanks Barb for asking this question. I too have heard the network chefs talk about them. I feel it is unfair of them to use them in their recipe without giving most of us a good way to substitute. I live in the north and I asked my manager in the vegie dept what they were and he did not know. I finally heard it on Martha Stewarts show. Now I know I will never see or use them because of their viability. I've never been a fan of lemon because the acidity is hard on my taste buds, but these sound like wonderful. Oh well.
    Irish
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  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    BarbNY and Irishand do you have a farmer's market in your area? I get Meyer lemons at the farmer's market in South Bend, Indiana which is extreme northern Indiana. Carol
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    Carol

  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    I have a tree in my back yard. I have lemons all year around.

    When we bought the house in 1976 I went looking for a lemon tree. I wanted a mature tree, but I didn't have much money. So after visiting many nurseries I came home with a tree 12" high with one lemon on it and it cost me $1.50. I have had lemons every year since. They are wonderful to just eat. Sweet/sour. I love them.

    connieh
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  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
    Our farmers markets are a very sorry state of affairs here in the winter at least. One I went to I was looking for sweet potatoes, I picked on up out of the box and I felt something gushy ... oh gross they were rotten and I put my hand right through one. I still get grossed out thinking about it!!!! I'll continue to try, maybe in NYC at some specialty or gourmet shops. All this work to find them, they better be worth it!!!!

    Thanks again everyone for responding.
    I am so envious of those that have lemon trees in their yards. How wonderful that must be.

    Barb

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  • RE: ?? About Meyer Lemons???
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