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Depression Era Recipes

Last post Aug 19, 2014 10:39 AM by bbed . 208 replies.

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  • Depression Era Recipes
    I grew up hearing my parents and grandparents talk about the Depression and my mother still made some of the foods from the recipes that were created in those hard times. Although they often substituted ingredients, they were always great to eat.

    One of the easiest (which my Mom often made for us) was creamed peas over toast -- also she would chop hard cooked eggs, add them to a white sauce (it was bechemel but I don't think she ever realized that?), and we had creamed eggs over toast too.

    I also remember an "apple" pie that was actually made with Ritz crackers -- really tasted like apple pie?

    Does anyone else out there have any Depression Era recipes you remember or would like to share??

    Judy
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    Vintage WW1 Eggless, Milkless, Butterless Cake

    1 cup water
    2 cups raisins
    1 tsp. cinnamon
    1/2 tsp. cloves
    1 cup brown sugar
    1/3 cup lard (shortening)
    1/4 tsp. nutmeg
    1/4 tsp. salt
    2 cups flour
    1 tsp. baking soda
    1/2 tsp. baking powder

    Place water, raisins, cinnamon, cloves, brown sugar, lard (shortening), nutmeg and salt in a saucepan and mix. Place on heat and bring to a boil. Cook 3 minutes. Allow to cool, then sift together the flour, baking soda and baking
    powder. Stir into cooked mixture.
    Place in a greased loaf pan and bake at 350F for one hour.


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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    Twicat, I remember this one too! It is a great one! Thanks!

    Any others out there?

    Does anyone have the recipe for that Ritz Cracker "apple" pie? I know it called for cream of tartar, and I believe also some vinegar??
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    Ritz Mock Apple Pie

    The classic pie, featuring Ritz crackers baked in a golden crust, is perfect for the holidays.

    Pastry for two-crust 9-inch pie
    36 RITZ Crackers, coarsely broken (about 1 3/4 cups crumbs)
    1 3/4 cups water
    2 cups sugar
    2 teaspoons cream of tartar
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    Grated peel of one lemon
    2 tablespoons margarine or butter
    1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

    Roll out half the pastry and line a 9-inch pie plate. Place cracker crumbs in prepared crust; set aside.

    Heat water, sugar and cream of tartar to a boil in saucepan over high heat; simmer for 15 minutes. Add lemon juice and peel; cool.

    Pour syrup over cracker crumbs. Dot with margarine or butter; sprinkle with cinnamon. Roll out remaining pastry; place over pie. Trim, seal and flute edges. Slit top crust to allow steam to escape.

    Bake at 425°F for 30 to 35 minutes or until crust is crisp and golden. Cool completely.


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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    There is a great cookbook with stories all from the depression era, mostly middle America. It is
    "Stories and Recipes of the Great Depression of the 1930's and More from Your Kitchen Today"
    by Janet Van Amber Paske. amazon.com has sample pages of this cookbook on the website.
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    Thanks, Homestyle! But I would really like to hear the recipes that people out there remember -- and maybe the family stories that go with them??

    And Twinkle, thank you for the mock applie pie -- I am sure that is the recipe I remember.

    I wonder why Ritz crackers were cheaper than apples -- or were they???

    Judy
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    When I first joined here on BB I posted Depression Yeast cornbread and there was not many hits on it I don't think. But that is ok, my family absolutely loves it, people just don't know what they are missing though. hehe. Have a good day, Connie
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    The book sounds great, can't wait to check it out.

    Thanks, this is an interesting thread. Everytime my father comes up to see us he talks about what great food came out of his mother and grandmothers kitchen. Would love to make some things for him.

    Barb
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    Thanks Homestyle for the book recommendation ... just checked it out on Amazon and bought a used copy! Can't wait.

    Barb
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    I just did a search and found and copies the recipe for Depression Yeast Cornbread. Thanks for the recipe -- I'll try it.

    I'm not good at bread that has to be kneaded, so this sounds like one I might be able to do!

    Judy
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    Crazy Cake.
    My mom used to make this a olot for us kinds, her mom used to make it for her family.

    3 cups all-purpose flour
    2 cups white sugar
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 teaspoons baking soda
    1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
    3/4 cup vegetable oil
    2 tablespoons distilled white vinegar
    2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    2 cups cold water
    Directions
    1Sift flour, sugar, salt, soda, and cocoa together into a 9 x 13 inch ungreased cake pan. Make three wells. Pour oil into one well, vinegar into second, and vanilla into third well. Pour cold water over all, and stir well with fork.Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 30 to 40 minutes, or until tooth pick inserted comes out clean.
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    Here is the chicken soup recipe that my grandmother made before the depression, during and after as they lived poor no matter what the era. LOL She said this recipe was the way her greatgrandmother made it she says it goes back to the colony times.

    Boil chicken and remove from bones. (left over roasted or baked chicken is fine)

    Heat broth until boiling and then reduce heat and sprinkle in corn meal. Whisk until thickened and stir in chicken. Add salt and pepper to taste. No measurements as the cooks long ago did not use measurments. Sometimes they might have a lot of broth sometimes not.

    My kids love this soup. It is real comfort food and the only one they ask for when they are sick. Of course my grandmothers used home raised chiken, simmered chicken broth, and probably fresh ground corn. My kids will eat it made from broth from a can.

    My grandmother said some people were so bad off during the depression that they ate gar soup. Gar is a fish that was always thrown back in the lake. Both of my set of grandparents and their parents had big gardens, canned, raised chickens and hunted. Dairy was traded for fish, produce or eggs with the folks that had cows. She said there were always the shiftless that had no gumption to fend for themselves with a garden or doing field work for food. She said the kids of those families looked half starved. The women folk would gather up food and take it to them.
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    The Ritz Mock Apple Pie is great! I made it about 8 years ago, not thinking it would taste anything like an Apple pie. Boy, was I wrong and to this day, still cant figure out how it turns out the way it does but the crackers actually LOOK and TASTE like real apples! Its a keeper in my book!
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    Thanks Cake Decorator -- what a great, FUN, recipe!

    Judy
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  • RE: Depression Era Recipes
    Homestyle, I REALLY enjoyed your story. Reading that was as much fun as getting the recipe for chicken soup. I had NEVER heard of chicken soup made that way, and these are the kinds of recipes that should be kept to "pass on" to another generation.

    Judy
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