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Italian Horn Bread

Last post Dec 25, 2011 8:28 AM by Knowles1 . 11 replies.


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  • Italian Horn Bread

    Does anyone have a recipe for the Italian Horn bread.  When my kids and grandchildren were teething you would let the horns harden and they were munch on them, the bread is pretty good too

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

     I found this after doing a search on the internet. Hope it is what you are looking for.

    Joan

    Horn Bread

    Though the families who sold horn bread in Plymouth won't divulge their recipes, this version comes from 92-year-old Agnes Cocci Brigida, who lives in North Plymouth.

    3 c. flour

    1 tsp. salt

    1 c. warm water

    1 pkg. yeast

    1 tsp. sugar

    3 tbsp. oil

    Activate yeast in warm water

    and sugar. Place all ingredients in a food processor and process until it forms

    a ball. Remove and knead a few times. Let rise, covered,

    in a warm place. Punch down, shape into horn shape, set in warm place, and let rise again. Bake at 350 degrees until done (lightly browned).

    From "Nonna's Cucina and Beyond . . . A Collection of Recipes and Anecdotes." Available from Marlene Brigida Baldwin, 25 Acrebrook Road, Keene, N.H. 03431

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

    It is funny that you sent that recipe.  I have that and have made it but it is not as good as the real thing.  Are you from Plymouth? because I am

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

    bump

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

    Donna Robischeau

    It is funny that you sent that recipe.  I have that and have made it but it is not as good as the real thing.  Are you from Plymouth? because I am

     

    Hi, Donna. No, I'm afraid I've lived in Texas most of my life and to be honest, I had never heard of Italian Horn Bread before your post. I just tried to do a search to help you find it. How funny that you have the same recipe. I hope someone helps you find the recipe you are looking for.

    Joan

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

    Donna, since your from that area...have you ever asked anyone to share their recipe with you?  I know when I was younger I was always told, "you NEVER ask someone for their recipe".  That came from my grandmother who was an awesome cook and baker.  I found when you establish yourself as a "trustworthy" person, people are willing to share.  I have not and will never give out recipes from those that have shared them with me.  The worst you could get from asking someone in your community that you know makes what your looking for is a big "shame on you" for asking.

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

    Yes

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

    The recipe is guarded.  A restaurant had the recipe but has gone out of business and supposedly when they "bought"  the recipe it was never to be given out.  In my opinion when some asks for a recipe that would be a compliment .  That's my way of thinking anyways.  When some one asks me for one I give it.Big Smile

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

    Donna, I don't have the recipe for you but I did find an article about it. The article says that the bread is for sale in North Plymouth, in case you'd like to buy some. I'm Italian myself and sure would like to be able to buy some of it. Reminds me of my Grandparents. Big Smile Here's part of the article for you.

    "Then, in 2005, Doris Pedrini, Govoni’s mother and Etelredo’s daughter-in-law, did something that initially stunned her family: She shared the Pedrini recipe for horn bread with Kosta Haveles, owner of the 3A Café and Bakery in North Plymouth.

    And so horn bread became available once again, this time baked by Jackie Jardim.

    Peter Nionakis has since bought the 3A Café and Bakery, where Jardim still bakes, and he continues to honor Doris Pedrini’s requests that the recipe be kept secret and that the bread be distributed only through North Plymouth businesses.

    The bread is sold at 3A Café and Bakery, Piantedosi’s Butcher Shop, Perry’s Market, and Clyde’s Deli, all in North Plymouth."

    Here's the site for you if you want to read the whole article:

    http://www.mymfn.com/?p=1224

    Virginia

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

    Thanks for the article.  I am from North Plymouth and that restaurant closed about 2 weeks ago.  I don't know yet if it is up for sale and will they sell the recipe to the new owners.  I know the Pedrini family and like I said it is "guarded"        

     

     

    bump

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

    donna,

    35 yr plimouthian, was looking for same recipe, found this page and have been tweeking it. 

    made 1 today and ate1/2 , try this

    disolve1 tsp sugar in 1 cup warm water, add 2 pkgs yeast  (1 cake) let activate for 10-15 min

    add 3/4 tsp kosher salt to 3 cups enriched bleached bread flour ( I used blue bird)

    now mix 1 tblsp olive oil into the yeast mixture

    pour the yeast mixture into the flour mixture use two fingers to mix, once able to pick up and form ball,,

    add just enough flour to dust, put in lightly oiled bowl in sun until 2-3 times size

    punch down form stretched out  x  with dough, let rise 2 times size on baking sheet pre-heat oven to 375

    cut shallow x in middle of loaf ,bake @ 375 for 15 min turn down to 350 bake until brown.(10-15 more)

    not perfect but real close!!

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  • Re: Italian Horn Bread

    Hi Donna, English but married to a No. Plymouth gentleman (Fornaciari) for a long time now; what a cooking combo our house is. His nonna would get quite cross with him when he was little because behind her back he would scoop out the soft center of the horn bread with his finger leaving only the intact crust for dinner.  Is it my imagination or are the current hornbreads quite a bit smaller than the originals and there's just something different about them, maybe the type of oven now used. This goes way way back but does your family remember taking their chickens to the rear of Clyde's Bakery to be roasted for Saturday supper? Those were the days before the Cordage row houses had ovens. Off subject but we all made toots 3 weeks ago, for the rest of you readers they are the little tortellini, and cooked in your best chicken broth, a bowl of them with hornbread...the best. My MIL also made the tortia (sp?) filled with ricotta & squash, a must eat for New Years Day! Hope this brought back good memories for you.

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