Recipes for hungry, poor people | Taste of Home Community  
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Recipes for hungry, poor people

Last post Jul 28, 2009 2:16 PM by Little Miss Alicia . 23 replies.


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  • Recipes for hungry, poor people

    I just posted three recipes in response to the lady's letter about her husband getting laid off for the second time this year.  Thank goodness she has a job and still has some resources available. I am printing these recipes here because I  thought everyone might benefit or would like to try them if not because of necessity - perhaps to get a feel for what can be cooked up with very little in the cupboard.

    Cornmeal pasta dish:

    1 cup cornmeal, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 teaspoon salt and 1 cup cold water.  Mix together in a heavy pot and then add 2 cups boiling water and 1 tablespoon cooking oil.  Cook until very thick.  Remove from hear and dip large spoonfuls on serving dish.  Top with pasta sauce and parmesean cheese.

    Poor Man's stew:  This is a supper dish to be made from garden vegtables.  Cook together potatoes, onions, tomatoes, beans and corn (okra is good too) in whatever amounts you have.  Season with bacon drippings, salt and pepper or any other seasonings available.  Serve over crumbled  cornbread in bowls.

    Mashed potato sandwich - Mix together leftover mashed potatoes, 1 tablespoon prepared mustard, and l tablespoon diced onion. Can add a bit of salad dressing and spread on bread. Honest, this is really good.

    Hugs,

    Beth

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Mary Beth Bristow
  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

     The Poor Man's Stew sounds goodStick out tongue

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  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

     We ran a post years ago that was titled - I have more month left over than my money (or something like that).  It is an excellent post.  I read it then and read it a while ago when someone bumped it.  It really is good.  There are people here who can find this and bump it up.  I am sure there are people who haven't seen it.  I am not that technically able.

    Janet

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  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    HI,

    I KNOW IN MY CITY, THE GARDNERS ARE UNITING FOR THE LESS FORTUNATE, AND HAVING A GIVE AWAY OF THE EXTRA'S IN THE GARDENS....OR VERY CHEAP, LIKE A .10CENT SALE, THEY BRING WHAT THEY CANT USE, LIKE PEPPERS, SQUASH, ZUCCS, LETTUCE, ANYTHING,,,,,,AND PEOPLE CAN GO AND GET WHAT THEY NEED....LOOK FOR MORE OF THESE..WE HAVE TO STICK TOGETHER AND HELP THE ONES THAT ARE LESS FORTUNATE THEN SOME...

    .AMERICAN ENDS IN   " I CAN"

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    SMILES GO A LONG WAY..SO LAUGH AND SMILE TODAY! ENJOY LIFE!

    MY DOBEE DOO BLACK LAB AND BEST FRIEND!Big Smile

  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    Another recipe for the cornmeal mush recipe above is to put it in a bread pan, keep in s cool place. Slice into 1" pieces (like you would slice a loaf of bread) and lightly brown in oil in a skillet.  Drain on paper towel.  Then serve with pancake syrup and butter.  The cornmeal has quite a bit of protein as well as carbs needed for hard work.  This also would work as a base for chili and cheese, and would be something like a corn tortilla, only more corny (ha). Sorry about the pun.

    Beth 

     

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    Mary Beth Bristow
  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    I saw the basics of this cornmeal recipe today on food channel and they call it polento Italian style- it looked very good and yes- I am sure it would be good.--add some shredded cheese on top for style- it does not have to be a lot --

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    huggles from Meme
  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    My grandmother made corn meal mush for us kids for breakfast when I was growing up. We put brown sugar and milk on it. We loved it!!

    I've often said that women today don't really now HOW to cook. My mother could make a meal out of almost anything, and it was good substantial food. No convenience mixes, no ready made dinners. Macaroni and tomatoes was a favorite dish of my brother and I.  All it contained was elbow macaroni and a can of stewed tomatoes!  We loved it along with bread and butter. My mom had tons of those kinds of meals.  Beef or chicken and dumplings was another favorite. She could stretch a small amount of beef, or a few pieces of chicken into a meal for the whole family.

     

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  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    My husband's mom used to serve cabbage noodles for dinner - just onion, cabbage and noodles sauteed in a pan.  Filling and very cheap.  We have made it for dinner at home too. 

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  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    cabbage with onions and noodles is called haluski and my MIL made it and I love it.  Was at a fair last summer and they wanted $4.50 for a plate of haluski - it smelled wonderful - wonderful enough for me to go and grab a head of cabbage and go home and make a big batch for a lot less than $4.50.

    Janet

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  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    Janet, 

    Wow $4.50! a serving.  I didn't even realize the dish had a name Huh?.  I have some cabbage growing in pots along my driving way - I'm sure some of that will make it into a batch.  I was thinking of trying a batch with bacon added to it  - she never did it that way, but I thought might be good - what do you think since you know the dish?  (My mom cooked tons of things in bacon grease - I know that was healthy :), but we didn't waste.

    Liz

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  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

     

    Go for it - the recipe I know only used butter but I know that my grandmother kept a can of bacon grease on her counter and used it often. Who knows, maybe it will be a keeper recipe.

    Let us know how it tastes.  Cabbage, onions, noodles and butter (bacon grease) nothing better.

    Janet

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  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    I shred cabbage,  Fry a few pieces of  cut up bacon 2-3. Then add cabbage stir fry for awhile, then cover and let steam for awhile to finish.  Season to taste.  Yummy.  But, if I were poor bacon would be the last thing I would be buying.  The are much more nutrient rich foods available.

     

    Soups of any kind.  A casserole.

     

    DH's family used to make what they call noodles, eggs and meat.  Cooked spaghetti any meat available, chopped boiled eggs and chopped green onion then topped off with soy sauce.  He still likes it today. 

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  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    Hello, All I'm new here, my name is Annalisa and I'm from California but now live in Australia. I usually post over in Backyard Chat.

    This post made me think of when my kids were small and my EX used to change jobs fairly often. Things were hard financially and we became what I used to call "economic vegetarians" . We lived on beans (especially pintos and lentils), rice, some dairy (mostly cheese) and LOTS of vegetables.

    I was the Queen of "Mystery Burritos" which were tortillas filled with leftovers, cheap salsa, a little cheese, and veggies. My kids didn't know any better and even now still eat Mystery Burritos sometimes as adults. 

     I personally think it's a shame that simple food-combining techniques aren't used more. A person doesn't need to use meat or other protein each day to have a decent diet, IMHO.  

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  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    Annalisa,

    I often make for my family a mixture of black beans, tomatoes, corn and a bit of taco seasoning (I buy a large container for a few dollars - lasts for months).  I serve this either over rice (that I buy by the 15 lb bag) or wrapped in tortillas with a bit of cheese - my family loves them.  I am lucky to have children that love beans in general!  This makes a meal for 4+ for a couple dollars!

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  • Re: Recipes for hungry, poor people

    It's me again - it is possible that bacon would be on the "we can't afford it this week" list, and yet you might have a big sack of pinto beans to cook.  I love the recipes with tomatoes, rice, tortillas and seasonings - which can make plain brown beans or white beans as well taste really good.  

    To get a really tasty flavor for your beans without adding smoked meat or bacon, buy a bottle of  Wrights Hickory Seasoning (liquid smoke) and add it when the beans are cooked - be careful to not add too much or it will be too strong.  Also, a bonus with this is that you are not using any fat at all.

    The same seasoning is really good to marinate chicken pieces in (addthe smoke flavoring to some water with a bit of brown sugar, and ketchup) and then bake on top of a pan of beans that have had molasses (if you have) and ketchup added.  We can make a meal out of this using chicken legs, or the thigh/leg portions.  

    Good old-fashioned food that fills you up without a lot of chemicals and expense.

    Hugs,

    Beth

     

     

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    Mary Beth Bristow